Alec Baldwin’s hair channels Donald Trump at #SAGAwards

http://twitter.com/#!/booth1/status/295703706450681856

Why does Alec Baldwin have Donald Trump on his head? #SAGAwards

— Steve Byk (@Steve_Byk) January 28, 2013

I stand corrected. Alec Baldwin won for Best Justin Bieber Impression. #SAGAwards twitter.com/DJ_On_Point/st…

— J.T. Morris (@DJ_On_Point) January 28, 2013

Actor Alec Baldwin took home a SAG award tonight for his role in NBC’s sitcom “30 Rock.” But judging from Twitter, his haircut deserved its own comedy award — with Donald Trump in a supporting role.

I’d like to nominate whatever is going on with Alec Baldwin’s hair for its supporting role in tonight’s show #seriouslywhatisthat #sagawards

— Andrea B. (@anders543) January 28, 2013

Alec Baldwin, did Donald Trump cut your hair? #SAGAwards

— Lena Adasheva (@LenaAdasheva) January 28, 2013

“@cosmopolitan: Alec Baldwin’s hair. Discuss. #SAGAwards” what. the . hell?!

— Meghan Campbell (@mac0109) January 28, 2013

Um…what’s up with Alec Baldwin’s hair? It’s a little Donald Trump-y, no? #SAGAwards #AlecBaldwin #BadHair

— Brandon M. (@MisterBrandonM) January 28, 2013

Alec Baldwin needs to fire whoever’s been styling his hair lately

— Holly Thompson (@_ThoHo) January 28, 2013

It’s super weird that Alec Baldwin has emo hair now.

— Chris Black (@donetodeath) January 28, 2013

Seriously Alec Baldwin’s hair is distracting #SAGawards

— Kerri (@underyour_radar) January 28, 2013

alec baldwin should have his sag award revoked until he gets rid of that hair cut

— pissed @ gleeks (@agentvandyne) January 28, 2013

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2013/01/27/alec-baldwins-hair-channels-donald-trump-at-sagawards/

101 Bite-Size Party Foods

2. Deviled Eggs and Pickled Beets

Get the recipe from Bon Appetit

4. Wasabi Deviled Eggs with Roe and Crispy Nori Recipe

Get the recipe at CHOW

6. Classic Deviled Eggs with Herbs

Get the recipe at Food Family Finds

7. Bacon-Wrapped Artichokes

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10. Grilled Scallops Wrapped in Prosciutto

Get the recipe from Martha Stewart

11. Bacon-Wrapped Apricots Stuffed with Pistachio and Mozzarella

Get the recipe from food52

12. Bacon-Wrapped Squash Bites

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13. Bacon-Wrapped Brussels Sprouts

Get the recipe from Taste As You Go

14. Turkish Spiced Meatballs with Pomegranate Yogurt Sauce

Get the recipe from Gourmet

16. Korean-Style Cocktail Meatballs

Get the recipe at Spoon Fork Bacon

17. Lamb Meatballs with Lemon-Cumin Yogurt

Get the recipe at CHOW

18. Scallion Meatballs with Soy Ginger Glaze

Get the recipe from Smitten Kitchen

19. Meatballs Sliders

Ok so this isn’t one bite either, but it is the best meatball recipe around. Get the recipe at Bon Appetit

22. Homemade Bratwurst Bites with Beer and Horseradish Mustard

Get the recipe at Bon Appetit

23. Mongolian Beef Kebabs with Chile Jam

Get the recipe from CHOW

24. Arepas with Pulled Pork and Pickled Onion

Get the recipe from Gourmet

25. Wild Mushroom Ragoût on Crispy Polenta with Comte Cheese

Get the recipe from Bon Appetit

26. Cauliflower Feta Fritters with Pomegranate

Get the recipe from Smitten Kitchen

28. Roasted Grape Pavlova Bites

Get the recipe from Bon Appetit

30. Tiny Eggs Benedict

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31. Pear Blue Cheese Yam Appetizers

Get the recipe from Pham Fatale

33. Rum Soaked Watermelon with Goat Cheese and Mint

Get the recipe at Crap I Eat

34. Spanish Ham with Olives and Oranges

Get the recipe from Martha Stewart

35. Sweet Potato and Pancetta Gratin

Get the recipe at food52

37. Mini Black Bean Cakes with Carnitas and Avocado

Get the recipe at CHOW

39. Baccalà Mantecato (Grilled Polenta with Dried Cod Mousse)

Get the recipe at Saveur

40. Mini Baked Potatoes with Aioli and Pimientos Recipe

41. Asian Pear Tartlets with a Spiced Port Reduction

Asian Pear Tartlets with a Spiced Port Reduction

<a href="http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr02/2012/12/7/12/enhanced-buzz-15747-1354903050-9.jpg" re

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/emofly/101-one-bite-appetizers

Thank a farmer: National Agriculture Day highlights food, fiber producers

http://twitter.com/#!/cheerRD/status/314118130064576512

Today is National Agriculture Day, and the nation’s food and fiber producers are using the #AgDay hashtag to remind the rest of America of their contribution to the nation’s people and its economy. The hashtag has produced a bumper crop of trivia along with notes of thanks.

Oh yeah! Got restocked with Kobe Beef! Happy #AgDay to me! And all of you as well!

— Shelby Bodine (@shelbybodine) March 19, 2013

Thank a farmer. Without them, you’d be hungry #AgDay

— Bluto (@BlutarskyTFM) March 19, 2013

With agriculture you’d be naked and hungry. Thank a farmer or rancher today. #AgDay #respect #thankafarmer

— Paige McCauley (@pmacdaddy25) March 19, 2013

A shout out to my #dairymom friends & their hard working families on #AgDay. Thank you for all you do!

— Stephanie Cundith (@scundithRD) March 19, 2013

Pope Francis tweeted “….let us be loving custodians of creation.”I’m sure he wasn’t talking about #agday but it definitely fits!

— Jennifer Heim (@jmheim33) March 19, 2013

Did you know soybeans are an important ingredient of crayons? One acre of soybeans can produce 82,368 crayons! #agday #crayons

— Olivia Jaco (@OHH_blivia) March 19, 2013

Every 9 cows on a farm employ one professional in the community. #AgDay

— Florida Milk (@FloridaMilk) March 19, 2013

Did you know baseballs are filled with sheep’s wool? How cool is that? #AgDay

— Senate Ag Committee (@SenateAg) March 19, 2013

Blue Ridge Mountain farmers are getting ready for spring. #AgDay Photo: twitter.com/DaynaReggero/s…

— Dayna Reggero (@DaynaReggero) March 19, 2013

Blackberry fan? Oregon is #1 national producer of them! Especially proud to be an Oregonian on #AgDay. 1.usa.gov/ZbKJrE

— Ron Wyden (@RonWyden) March 19, 2013

Happy #AgDay everyone.Virginia #agriculture is the Commonwealth’s largest industry with a $55 Billion impact. Be sure and thank a farmer

— Matt Lohr (@Mjlohr71) March 19, 2013

Happy National Ag Day! Retweet and we will send you an IMA bumper sticker! #AgDay #ThankAFarmer twitter.com/IMakeAmerica/s…

— I Make America (@IMakeAmerica) March 19, 2013

#NorthDakota produces a substantial amount of #pork. Also, did you know a pig can run a 7-minute mile? #agday

— Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (@SenatorHeitkamp) March 19, 2013

Massachusetts is home to almost 8,000 farms that employ approximately 13,000 workers & about 80% of these farms are family-owned #AgDay

— William Mo Cowan (@SenMoCowan) March 19, 2013

Happy National #AgDay to all who contribute to #Ag in Kansas & in America. The average #farmer feeds 155 people + you twitter.com/JerryMoran/sta…

— Jerry Moran (@JerryMoran) March 19, 2013

If you just found out today is #AgDay, it’s not too late to celebrate.

Tonight I will celebrate by enjoying a nice corn fed, fossil fuel supplied #beef steak with my #farmer! Hows that for #AgDay!?

— Jenny Dewey (@jenlynndewey) March 19, 2013

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2013/03/19/thank-a-farmer-national-agriculture-day-highlights-food-and-fiber-producers/

21 Facts You Didn’t Know About "Pitch Perfect"

Get ready to be pitch-slapped with some mind-blowing information. Better hide those toners.

1. “Cups” was never supposed to be in the film.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via breakfastwithlevi.tumblr.com

Anna Kendrick learned about the song through Reddit, and told Collider, “Originally that scene was going to be like ‘I’m a Little Tea Cup’ or something. It was supposed to be weird and funny and the second that they saw me do that, they were like, ‘OK. That’s your audition song.’”

2. A shower scene between Rebel Wilson and Adam DeVine got cut from the film.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via hannabloggeria.blogspot.com

DeVine told Vulture that the two “improv-ed a lot of the scenes with each other. Some we made, some got cut — a lot of the really steamy stuff.”

3. Adam DeVine’s girlfriend, Kelley Jakle, is a professional a capella singer.

Adam DeVine's girlfriend, Kelley Jakle, is a professional a capella singer.

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Universal Pictures

She plays Jessica in the film, and she was a contestant on the competition series The Sing Off.

4. “No Diggity” was never in the script.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via aisese.tumblr.com

In fact, many of the original songs didn’t make the cut.

5. Categories on the riff-off wheel included, Ugly Lead Singers, Songs Glee Ruined, and Overplayed Black Eyed Peas Songs.

Categories on the riff-off wheel included, Ugly Lead Singers, Songs Glee Ruined, and Overplayed Black Eyed Peas Songs.

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Universal Pictures

The complete list includes: Ladies of the ’80s, Songs About Sex, Black Michael Jackson, White Michael Jackson, Christian Rock, Hair Bands, TV Theme Songs, Reggae Time, Stadium Rock, The Judd’s, Famous Duets, Puppet Songs, Party Rock Anthems.

6. Adam DeVine accidentally pegged a cameraman in the face with a burrito while shooting the gas station scene.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via fanpop.com

“Yeah, it was when I was supposed to throw a burrito at Rebel, and he said to aim for him, thinking I wouldn’t hit him, and I pegged him right in the face,” DeVine told Vulture.

7. Any time Anna Kendrick sings alone in the film, she was singing live on set.

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Kendrick pulled a Les Mis telling Collider, “I think something is a little bit lost in the recording studio.”

Via Universal Pitctures

8. During the hot tub scene in the Treble House, a porno is playing on the TV in the background.

During the hot tub scene in the Treble House, a porno is playing on the TV in the background.

View this image ›

Universal Pictures / Via lesfilmsdemavie—grahamguit.blogspot.com

Producer and actress Elizabeth Banks created the very strange faux porno for the scene.

9. Say Anything was the original movie Anna Kendrick and Skylar Astin were supposed to watch, not The Breakfast Club.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via buzzsugar.com

10. The cast participated in a month-long singing/dancing boot camp.

The cast participated in a month-long singing/dancing boot camp.

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Universal Pictures / Via youtube.com

The producers brought down the cast to Baton Rouge a month before filming so they could learn every dance move and song perfectly.

11. Ester Dean, who performs “S&M,” actually wrote the song for Rihanna as well.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures

12. The riff-off scene originally had 17 songs instead of eight.

The riff-off scene originally had 17 songs instead of eight.

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Universal Pictures / Via wevegotyoucovered.buzznet.com

Screenwriter Kay Cannon soon realized that that many songs would never fit in the film’s budget.

13. The scene was also shot at 3 a.m. in an old, empty outdoor pool.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures

The film was shot during early winter, and Skylar Astin told MovieViral, “There were no places to keep cast chairs or warmers things so we bonded a lot that night.”

14. Amy Poehler and Kristen Wiig were considered for Elizabeth Banks’ role.

Michael Loccisano / Getty Images

Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

 

15. While Becca is at the college fair, students are playing Quidditch in the background.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures

You can even hear one player shout, “Pass the Quaffle! I’m open!”

16. The screenwriter actually asked Rebel to audition for the film through Facebook.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Candace Lowry / BuzzFeed

17. Aubrey’s vomit is a nasty concoction of pineapple juice, tomato juice, and chicken noodle soup that apparently smelled like cheese.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via sheknows.com

18. “Vader” means “father” in Dutch, not German.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures

“Vater” means “father” in German.

19. “Fat Amy” is based off of a nickname Amy Poehler used on herself while pregnant.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via persephonemagazine.com

20. Every cast member had to successfully sing a song for their audition.

21 Facts You Didn't Know About "Pitch Perfect"

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Universal Pictures / Via originalmotionpicturesoundtrack.tumblr.com

Adam DeVine chose the Family Matters theme song, while Rebel Wilson went for Lady Gaga’s “Edge of Glory.”

21. There is an “aca-innapropriate” blooper reel that includes cut jokes, and some not-so-PG-13 dialogue.

Video available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Yt942W49Zhk. Universal Pictures / Via youtube.com

LINK

“Pitch Perfect 2” Begins Filming In Baton Rouge

LINK

14 Things I Need To See In A “Pitch Perfect” Sequel

LINK

Elizabeth Banks: “Pitch Perfect 2” Hits Theaters In Less Than 365 Days

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/candacelowry/facts-you-didnt-know-about-pitch-perfect

Is There Any Reason Why A Parent Shouldn’t Vaccinate Their Child?

These are the facts behind the worries.

It’s natural for new parents to have questions about what they put into their baby’s body, including vaccines.

Getty Images/iStockphoto Stefan_S

To separate fact from fiction, BuzzFeed Life spoke to two experts, and asked them about the most common concerns new parents have about vaccinating their kids.

We talked to Dr. Kate O’Brien, pediatric infectious disease specialist and executive director of the International Vaccine Access Center at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Dr. Jon Abramson, professor of pediatrics at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Both doctors are members of the World Health Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization, and really know their stuff. Here’s what they had to say.

1. Should I be worried that the measles vaccine causes autism?

In a word, no. The idea that vaccines were linked to autism came from a research paper published in a prominent scientific journal. But it turns out that the research was completely wrong — the study author, Andrew Wakefield, actually falsified his data (meaning, he made it up). The paper was retracted, and Wakefield lost his license (see more on that here). Abramson says that research shows absolutely no link between vaccines and autism.

2. I’ve heard that the mercury in vaccines might cause autism too. Is that true?

First, regarding mercury in vaccines causing autism: “The answer is unequivocally no,” says Abramson, who adds that many studies have confirmed this.

But something else worth mentioning: Most vaccines don’t contain mercury anymore, anyway. The measles vaccine doesn’t, for instance. “There’s a little bit of mercury in some flu vaccines — the ones made by egg,” Abramson says. But even those vaccines contain incredibly small amounts of mercury that aren’t harmful to you, he says. See more about the different types of flu vaccines here, if you want some more information.

Alice Mongkongllite / BuzzFeed / Via Getty Images/iStockphoto decade3d

3. Can vaccines cause multiple sclerosis?

Research hasn’t found a connection between vaccines and multiple sclerosis, either. Abramson specifically mentions a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in January. The study authors tracked nearly 4 million women who received the HPV vaccine, and found no causal relationship between the vaccine and multiple sclerosis rates — the percentage of women in the study who were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis during the time period was no higher than the rate of multiple sclerosis for the general population. Meaning: The vaccine and the diagnosis weren’t related.

4. Is it true today’s vaccinations are too much for a child’s immune system to handle all at once?

“Your immune system when you’re born starts getting exposed to many more antigens than on any day you’re vaccinated,” Abramson says. Essentially, adding one more to the tens of thousands your baby is exposed to on a regular basis isn’t going to make a difference to your kid’s immune system.

And here’s something else that might make you feel better: “The vaccines that we give now, first of all, are vaccines that are really well characterized — we understand in a lot of detail what’s in those vaccines,” O’Brien says. “And although we’re giving more vaccines than we used to, we’re actually giving fewer exposures to those kids than we did years ago before the vaccines that weren’t as specifically designed.”

Meaning: Yes, it’s more shots — but those shots are so specific that your kid is actually getting way fewer exposures than what you were personally exposed to when you were a kid. More shots, less exposure.

5. I’ve heard it’s actually healthier for the body to develop healthy immunities via exposure to these diseases naturally. True?

The short answer to this is no, the vaccines are a much better way to develop an immunity — they let you build an immunity without actually having to get sick.

Here’s a longer answer.

Think about chicken pox parties from your own childhood. Chicken pox is a virus that’s much more severe and dangerous in adults than it is in children, so before the vaccine existed, parents would often intentionally expose their kids to the disease, to get it over with, rather than run the risk of them not catching it as kids and then getting it as adults. And that idea made sense to a degree, Abramson says: Natural exposure to the virus made the kids sick, definitely, but it also protected them from a potentially devastating disease in their future.

THAT BEING SAID, not all kids who got the chicken pox fared well and were totally fine. For starters, it’s a miserable bug, so even without serious complications, kids still suffered and felt terrible. Even scarier, though, is that many thousands of people ended up in the hospital from chicken pox each year, and 100 to 150 people died from it annually in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control. And we’re talking about the early 1990s here (the vaccine came out in 1995).

The thing about diseases that we vaccinate against is that for all of them, even healthy people can sometimes develop serious complications or even die from them (like with chicken pox). So getting vaccinated is a way to train your immune system to deal with those bad bugs without having to actually go through the whole process of being sick in the first place.

“Immune systems are constantly sampling the environment that we’re in,” O’Brien says. “We’re constantly in contact with tens of thousands of germs, and it’s important for the immune system to sample those things, because that’s how the immune system matures. Giving specific vaccines so that we’re targeting the immune system to respond to certain pathogens in the future is doing more of what our body is doing on a daily basis anyway.” It’s like a chicken pox party without actually having to get the chicken pox.

Alice Mongkongllite / BuzzFeed / Via Getty Images/iStockphoto RidvanArda

6. Is it true that vaccines do in fact have side effects?

Yes, definitely. “There are potential side effects in every vaccine,” Abramson says.

Hopefully this will make you feel better, though: “I think the first important point is, all vaccines that are recommended for use have undergone extensive evaluations — both for whether they work, and also for safety,” O’Brien says. “The second thing is, the most common side effects of vaccines are mild reactions that are self-resolving [meaning, they go away on their own]. Really local reactions, and in some vaccines some low-grade fever.”

But what about the really terrifying and scary side effects you may have read or heard about? O’Brien says that extreme reactions (like allergic reactions) can happen, but they are incredibly rare (often to the tune of about one in a million — or even more). And even then, it depends on the particular vaccine. “What you’re not hearing about are the millions of doses of vaccines that are given every year when nothing bad happens,” she says.

And another thing to remember: Just because something bad happens a few days or weeks after someone was vaccinated does not mean that the vaccine caused the bad thing to happen, O’Brien says. For example, think back to that recent study about the HPV vaccine and multiple sclerosis — numerous women during the course of the study did get diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. But the percentage of diagnoses was the same as the percentage in the general population as a whole. Meaning that the vaccine date just coincidentally happened around the same time as the diagnosis — but it didn’t cause the disease.

7. What about people who say measles isn’t so bad that I need to worry about it?

“There are [more than] 100,000 children dying of measles globally,” Abramson says. According to the World Health Organization, 145,700 people died from measles in 2013 across the world; most of them were children.

Some people say that measles deaths and complications from the measles typically affect people who are malnourished or unhealthy to begin with, and it’s not something that people in the United States need to worry about. That’s not true. For starters, anyone with a newborn has to worry, and anyone who has a compromised immune system (cancer patients, people with immunodeficiency diseases, and more). But even healthy people in the United States can end up in the hospital with measles, Abramson says. A rash and a fever might not sound like much, but the idea of an extended hospital stay might put that in perspective. And while the death rate is low from measles, it’s definitely not zero — and that’s true for healthy people and unhealthy people alike. See this post about what measles looks like to get a better idea of what we’re talking about.

8. If everyone else is vaccinating their kid why is it so important that I vaccinate mine?

Because vaccinations impact the community at large, and actually protect the most vulnerable people in it. A few things to know:

1. Some people can’t get vaccinated, due to medical reasons — or because they’re too young. People with compromised immune systems (cancer patients, people with genetic immunodeficiencies, and more) can’t get vaccines. And babies often can’t get some vaccines (like the measles), because their immune systems won’t actually respond to it yet. (“Nothing bad will happen, but it just won’t work,” O’Brien says. “It’ll be a wasted shot.”)

2. Vaccines aren’t 100% effective, so even people who get vaccinated could still potentially contract the disease in question.

3. HERD IMMUNITY is the idea that when enough people in a community get vaccinated against a disease, that protects the entire community (read: the vulnerable people who can’t be vaccinated). That’s because when so many people are protected, the disease just can’t spread from person to person.

4. When too many people choose not to get vaccinated, the herd immunity suffers. The babies and cancer patients are no longer protected if someone with the disease enters the community. It can spread to them — and that’s terrible, because many of these diseases are much more deadly in those populations specifically.

5. Without herd immunity, outbreaks can happen. Like what’s happening now.

See a few GIFs that illustrate how herd immunity works, here.

Alice Mongkongllite / BuzzFeed / Via Getty Images/iStockphoto luiscar

9. What about people who say that vaccines pose a greater risk than the small chance of catching the disease?

“That argument is this: Since we’ve wiped out these diseases like measles, why should I take any risk?” Abramson says. “The answer is exactly what’s happening right now. When we eliminated smallpox from the world, we stopped giving the vaccine. And if we ever eliminate polio from the world, which we’re getting closer and closer to doing, we will stop vaccinating. But things like measles are not eliminated from the world. There are many, many, many thousands of children globally dying from it, and until we can eliminate it from the world there’s a risk.”

10. I’ve heard that vaccines don’t actually work. True?

Not all vaccines are 100% effective in every person who gets them — that’s true. The measles vaccine, for instance, is only about 95% effective. And certain vaccines can become less effective over time, which means that adults need to get booster shots to make sure they remain protected. (Measles is not one of those — the measles vaccine ought to afford you protection for life, even if you got the shot decades ago, O’Brien says).

But Abramson says that statistics show that vaccines really do work. With chicken pox, for example, the rate of hospitalizations and death have declined by 90% since the introduction of the vaccine. And just looking at actual measles cases in the United States before and after vaccines: According to the CDC, from 1953 to 1963, the United States saw an average of 549,000 cases of measles per year. Between 2001 and 2011, by contrast, the median number of measles cases in the U.S. was 62. And the WHO says that between 2000 and 2013, the measles vaccines prevented an estimated 15.6 million deaths globally. Vaccines are responsible for those astonishing decreases. Vaccines work.

Getty Images Photodisc

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/mikespohr/is-there-any-reason-why-a-parent-shouldnt-vaccinate-their-ch

Argentina’s Colossal Perito Moreno Glacier

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

At 30 km (19 miles) in length and over 250 sq km (97 sq mi) in size, the Perito Moreno Glacier is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentine Patagonia. It is located in Los Glaciares National Park in the southwest Santa Cruz province of Argentina.

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

Perito Moreno is one of 48 glaciers fed by the Southern Patagonian Ice Field located in the Andes system shared with Chile. This icefield is the world’s third largest reserve of fresh water. [Source]

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Photograph by Christof Berger

The Perito Moreno Glacier is one of only three Patagonian glaciers that is growing. The reason remains debated by glaciologists. The terminus of the Perito Moreno Glacier is 5 kilometres (3 mi) wide, with an average height of 74 m (240 ft) above the surface of the water of Lake Argentino. It has a total ice depth of 170 metres (558 ft). [Source]

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

Due to its size and accessibility, Perito Moreno is one of the major tourist attractions in southern Patagonia. It is less than two hours by bus from El Calafate, and many tour companies run daily visits. A large visitor centre at the site features a walking circuit which allows visitors to view the southern flank and the east facing edge of the glacier.

In recent years, trekking tours on the ice have gained popularity. The two standard tours are a “mini-trekking” option, consisting of a short walk of about an hour and a half, and a “big ice” version, which is usually about five hours. [Source]

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

Los Glaciares National Park comprises an area of 4459 km². In 1981 it was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Its name refers to the giant ice cap in the Andes range that feeds 47 large glaciers, of which only 13 flow towards the Atlantic Ocean. The ice cap is the largest outside of Antarctica and Greenland. [Source]

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Photograph by JAKUB POLOMSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

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Photograph by Christof Berger