26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

It’s not a sport, it’s a lifestyle.

1. Getting into the pool for the first time and feeling the frigid water put you into shock.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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2. Waking up for morning practice at an ungodly hour.

Waking up for morning practice at an ungodly hour.

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3. If you’re a female swimmer, not being able to shave for months on end.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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4. And for the dude swimmers, having to shave EVERYWHERE for a big meet.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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5. Looking to the other lanes when you’re swimming breaststroke, even though you know you shouldn’t.


6. Swimming butterfly…

Swimming butterfly...

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Clive Rose / Getty Images

… because it feels like this.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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7. With your huge swimming shoulders, it’s nearly impossible to find clothing that fits.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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8. Deck changing, aka exposing yourself to the world.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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9. Dryland workouts, because your poor body is not capable of physical exertion on land.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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10. Knowing you are not the only one peeing in the pool.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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11. Two words: chlorine hair.

Two words: chlorine hair.

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12. Going for a big start and bellyflopping.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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13. You know you’ll make a bizarre face when you put on your goggles.

You know you'll make a bizarre face when you put on your goggles.

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14. Pray that you do not have leaky goggles, which are the GODDAMN WORST.


15. Nearly as distressing is when your goggles come completely off.

Nearly as distressing is when your goggles come completely off.

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16. Raccoon eyes, because your goggles can NEVER be too tight.


17. You also will permanently reek of chlorine.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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NBC Universal

18. Is being too ripped a thing? Because if anyone suffers from this problem, it’s swimmers.

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19. No amount of food can satiate you after a long practice.

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20. Crowded lanes, which make you want to scream at the top of your lungs.

Crowded lanes, which make you want to scream at the top of your lungs.

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21. Putting on your cap, when done incorrectly, can be excruciating.

Putting on your cap, when done incorrectly, can be excruciating.

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22. Getting water in your eyes. And your ears. And your nose. And your mouth. Basically, getting water in every orifice of your body.

Getting water in your eyes. And your ears. And your nose. And your mouth. Basically, getting water in every orifice of your body.

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Al Bello / Getty Images

23. Swimcest.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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24. False starts.

False starts.

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25. Swim coaches, because their favorite thing in the world is to give you a grueling set. Screaming at you is a close second.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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26. Test sets, or as swimmers know them, the deepest, darkest circle of hell.


But despite the early mornings, gross hair, and insane workouts, you still keep coming back for more.

26 Unforgettable Struggles Of Being A Swimmer

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Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/samstryker/struggles-swimmers-will-never-forget

23 Highly Specific Types Of Porn You Can Find On Pinterest

1. Spam Porn

Better than porn-spam.

2. Mineralogy Porn

Rock-hard.

4. Light Switch Porn

Such a turn-on.

(!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

5. Uplifting Soap Porn

8. Eames Chair Porn

9. Salad Porn

Oh look, I found the saddest word combo in the English language.

10. Calculator Porn

13. Basket Porn

You mean there’s MORE?!?

14. Vintage Radio Porn

15. Cactus Porn

Ow.

16. Game of Thrones Hair Porn

Pro-tip: get this sassy look by spending all your time DEFENDING THE REALM.

17. Swiss Font Porn

Oh, those Swiss.

18. Inspirational Pencil Porn

19. Yarn Porn

My kinda pr0n.

21. Negroni Porn

‘Tis the season.

22. Outdoor Bathtub Porn

23. Porn

GOOD ONE GUYS.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/alannaokun/porn-you-can-find-on-pinterest

Court: You Can’t Pay Fines With Money From Your Underpants

A sign spotted today at the district court office in York, Pennsylvania, said fines could not be paid using money from undergarments.

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Via ydr.com

A sign at the York County district court office of Judge Haskell including the following important messages:

Money from undergarments will not be accepted in this office.

Pajamas are not appropriate attire for district court.

Via yorkblog.com

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Via memetogo.com

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/aprilt16/reminder-dont-pay-court-fines-with-money-from-yo-nvch

Paralympian Considering Ending Her Own life After The Rio Games

Belgian paralympianMarieke Vervoort has announced that, once she’s competed in this year’s Rio Games, she will retire from herathleticcareer, and is contemplating euthanasia.

The 37-year-oldhas been battling aspinal degenerative disease since 2000, but hasn’t let it stop her from becoming one of the world’s most successful paratheletes – Marieke won gold and silver medals at the London Paralympics, and holds four world records in her category.

She’s going for gold again this year– telling French magazine Le Parisien that she hopes to “end her career on the podium at Rio”.

And next? Marieke has explained that she has a “bucket list” of things she wants to achieve, but that she has started to consider euthanasia.

“Everybody sees me laugh with my gold medal, but no one sees the dark side.

I suffer greatly, sometimes sleeping only ten minutes a night – and still go for the gold. Rio is my last wish.”

Marieke’s disease has left her paralysed, and often in terrible pain. As she explained, each year she has found herself able to do less and less; over the years, her athletic career had seen her try basketball, golf, fencing, surfing, triathlon and scuba diving, but her physical condition means that she can no longer participate.

Euthanasia is legal in Belgium, provided that you have the written consent of three doctors.

H/T Le Parisien

Image Credits: Getty

Read more: http://www.hellou.co.uk/2016/09/paralympian-considering-uthanasia-once-shes-competed-in-rio-games-104534/

Watch What Happens If You Try To Divide By Zero On This Mechanical Calculator

Youll probably remember from your math lessons at school that you cant divide a number by zero, even if you didnt understand why exactly. If you try to divide a number by zero on a electronicpocket calculator, itll pop upwith a message saying Error. If you try this on a mechanical calculator, it looks like youve ripped an irreversible hole in the fabric ofspace-time.

This video by MultiGlizda shows the chaos that unfolds when you try to divide by zero on a Facit ESA-01 mechanical calculator with its casing off. Not only does it give an interesting insight into how these old calculators work, it also reveals the slippery nature of the number zero and its division.

As YouTube channel Numberphile explains, division is based on subtraction. If you want to divide a number by a second number, you simply subtract the second number from the first over and over again. For example, 20 divided by 5 would be: 20 – 5 = 15, 15 – 5 = 10, 10 – 5 = 5, 5 – 5 = 0. Since that took 4 subtractions, the answer is 4.

However, divide 20 by 0 and youll end up subtracting 0 from 20 an infinite amount of times. While that doesnt mean that 0 equals infinity, it appears that the mechanical calculator is attempting to complete the infinite number of operations it believes it needs to complete the division. You can check out this Numberphile video if you want to know more about dividing by zero and why it doesnt equal infinity.

Meanwhile, some say the Facit ESA-01 is still flicking through numbers to this day.

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/technology/retro-mechanical-calculator-freaks-out-if-you-try-divide-zero

5 Syrian families didn’t know what they’d find in Canada. They found the perfect town.

On Sept. 21, 2016, after enduring the terror of the Syrian civil war, a year living as refugees in Turkey, and almost 27 hours of flying, Samah Motlaq, her husband, Talal, and their two young children touched down in the small lakeside community of Gander, Newfoundland, on the east coast of Canada.

Motlaq was unsure about leaving Turkey. She liked her life there, and her kids were finally settled after years of uncertainty and upheaval. But their family had friends in Gander who urged them to join them halfway across the world.

“Honestly, all I knew about Canada is that it is very cold in winter but [that] the opportunities for living [were] much better than in Turkey,” Motlaq says.

Still, she wasn’t sure how welcome her family would be in a small town and foreign culture in a country she’d never visited. Little did she know that welcoming newcomers had long been Gander’s brand.

15 years earlier, Gander played host when nearly 7,000 airline passengers were grounded there on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001.

When American airspace was closed following the attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., 38 planes were forced to land in the town, whose airport is home to one of the largest runways in the area a legacy left over from an era when aircraft had to make frequent refueling stopovers on their way to and from Europe.

With nothing but their hand luggage, travelers from six continents stepped off their planes to find food, clothes, shelter, and community waiting for them.

Since opening its doors that day, the town has been profiled in countless articles, a Tom Brokaw documentary, and even a new Broadway musical “Come From Away.”

In 2016, Gander opened its doors once again.

For many residents who helped the stranded passengers in 2001 by preparing meals, donating the contents of their closets, and taking them into their homes, welcoming refugees displaced by war in Syria was a no-brainer.

“I really think that this has been the most rewarding experience of volunteering since 9/11,” says Diane Davis, a retired elementary school teacher in Gander and a member of the committee coordinating the resettlement.

Davis, who along with several of her fellow teachers inspired a character in “Come From Away,” helped launch the committee in early 2016 with the goal of bringing five Syrian families to Gander.

In early June 2016, the committee received notice that the first family would be arriving in just two weeks. Thus began a mad dash to ensure the houses were fully furnished and stocked with food before they arrived.

“We felt as if we are at home from the very first moment,” Motlaq says. Hers was the fourth family to arrive in town with a fifth still on its way.

The members of the committee were used to scrambling. Just about every person on it, Davis explains, had been involved with housing, feeding, and transporting the “plane people” on 9/11.

“One day after the attack, an old lady came to me at my workplace at Walmart and she hugged me and said, ‘Do not be afraid. We love you and we are with you guys.'”
Samah Motlaq

“Ive been able to explain to [the refugee families], ‘Youre not the first people weve helped,'” she says. “‘This is the way a community works together. These are the kinds of things we take care of.'”

Resettling the families in Gander, Davis explains, is also an opportunity to revitalize the town, which has evolved into a “retirement community” in recent years.

“Were a province that has an aging demographic,” she says. “Were a province that has a declining population. Were a community that has employment and housing. Weve got a good, strong school system here.”

As a former educator who lives across the street from her old classroom, Davis has taken the lead in getting the refugee children, who range in age from 2 to 13, adjusted to their new school.

“I retired in June on a Friday and the first family arrived on a Tuesday. So retirement was three days long,” Davis says.

Her role involves everything from translation to registering the kids for classes to liaising with the parents in case of emergency. When one boy was getting in frequent trouble because he couldn’t ask for help, Davis wrote her phone number in his notebook and, with the help of Google Translate, explained that whenever he needed anything, he could show it to his teacher.

For Motlaq, who was born in Palmyra, Syria’s cultural capital, living in quiet Gander has been an adjustment from big-city life.

While she misses the activity, she is grateful for her new job at Walmart and the safety, quiet, and fellowship of the community particularly after a deadly shooting that claimed six lives at the Islamic Cultural Center in Quebec.

“One day after the attack, an old lady came to me at my workplace at Walmart and she hugged me and said, ‘Do not be afraid. We love you and we are with you guys,'” Motlaq says.

The conversation left her with a profound affection for her new adopted home. “I knew that day that Canada represents humanity and equality regardless religion or race.”

Five months before “Come From Away” opened on Broadway, the cast and crew flew to Newfoundland for two VIP performances in the Gander hockey rink.

Before the show arrived, Davis asked Irene Sankoff, the musical’s co-writer, for tickets for the eight Syrian adults. The production responded with tickets for all four families, including the children.

Explaining the concept of the performance to the newcomers, many of whom have limited English skills, was a challenge at first.

“They werent sure if they were going to see a hockey game,” Davis says. After showing them pieces of the NBC documentary, they began to connect their experience to that of the “plane people” 15 years earlier.

The group also met the cast and creative team of the show many of whom continue to support the resettlement effort with financial aid and, this past December, a trove of Christmas gifts.

“Santa Claus brought [the kids] sleds this year,” Davis says. “That may or may not have come via New York.”

For the families just finding their footing, the support has been invaluable. But for those who do speak English, like Motlaq and her husband, it was the performance, with its message of finding community amid chaos, that resonated the loudest.

“It is similar to our story,” she says.

“We came from away too.”

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/5-syrian-families-didnt-know-what-theyd-find-in-canada-they-found-the-perfect-town

You Can Now Find Out Which Of Your Selfies Were The Most Memorable

New research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technologys Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory proves selfie-lovers are right to assume followers want to see their mugs flash across Instagram news feeds.

Researchers devised an algorithm to predict how memorable or forgettable a photo is with near-human-like accuracy. The team members plan to take what they gathered and turn the algorithm into an app, which will subtly tweak users’ photos to make them more memorable.

Becauseallanyone wants in this life is a memorable photo.

In addition to itsnear-human-level facial memorability, the algorithm uses techniques from deep learning — like the ones that drive Siri on your iPhone and automatic photo tagging on Facebook — tosift through massive amounts of data andfind patterns on its own.

The team tested the algorithm againsthuman subjects by asking them how memorable they foundseveralnever-before-seen photos, and found the algorithm performed nearly the same.

Part of the research included the launch ofLaMem, short for Large-scale Image Memorability, a data set (the largest image memorability data setto date, in fact) that allows interested users totest the accuracyof the memorability measurement.

When you upload your photos, the demo scans your image for a few seconds before producing a heat map to show the most memorable aspects of the photo and the photo’s overall memorability score.

I went ahead and gave the “MemNet” algorithm a try with some old Instagram photos of my own, and the resultsvaried when compared tothe amount of likes they received at the time.

This photo received 111 likes on Instagram.


This photo received 88 likes on Instagram.


This photo received 260 likes on Instagram.


This photo received 109 likes on Instagram.

These photos were also posted at various times of day, which many users believe impacts the photos’ overall success rate in terms of longevity on Instagram news and activity feeds.

But, according to the memorability scale, it’s subject matter that makes the biggest difference. Compared to landscapes and skylines, selfies and subject-focused images seem to reign supreme.

Although Millennials are sure to love the impact the algorithm will have on their Instagram popularity, researchers envision developing more effective teaching resources,improving social media marketing and advertising content and even creating personalized “health assistants” for individuals who need memory assistance.

For now,instead of asking friends, “Is this Instagram-worthy?” plug the photo in to find out.

Subscribe to Elite Dailys official newsletter,The Edge, for more stories you don’t want to miss.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/social-news/mit-scientists-algorithm-selfies-most-memorable/1329404/