CNN lands interview with #FloodWallStreet’s ‘official spokesbear’ [photo]

http://twitter.com/#!/JenniferEckhart/status/514118062749282304

This #FloodWallStreet business is pretty serious. How serious?

This serious:

Polar bear on @CNN. Official spokes bear for #FloodWallStreet http://t.co/Df1hEUH4pB

— #FloodWallStreet (@FloodWallStreet) September 22, 2014

Wow.

This is CNN RT @AlexJamesFitz Just watched a polar bear interviewed for CNN #FloodWallStreet http://t.co/g5UtjOel3C pic.twitter.com/XjkCP6HnrB

— Matthew (@Matthops82) September 22, 2014

That’s a coup for the #FloodWallStreet clowns and for CNN!

CNN interviews polar bear. Likely gets higher ratings than @piersmorgan ever did. pic.twitter.com/4z2t0brvrE

— Matthew (@Matthops82) September 22, 2014

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Related:

Twitchy coverage of #FloodWallStreet 

 

 

 

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2014/09/22/hard-hitting-cnn-lands-interview-with-floodwallstreets-official-spokesbear-photo/

A Unique And Trendy Business Model That's Changing The Way People Shop

No business is perfect, but I really admire the ones that are constantly trying to be better. It can’t be easy to avoid the “anything to profit!” mindset in favor of “How can I leave the world a better, more sustainable place?”

Here’s how one CEO is shooting for the latter.

I promise I don’t live in a hole! I know there have been criticisms of TOMS Shoes and companies like it. But it looks like TOMS, at least, has been listening to them. Check out the CEO’s response to critics and his plan to have one-third of all shoes produced in the countries to which the company donates by the end of 2015. Jobs! Let’s hope it happens.

Read more: http://upworthy.com/a-unique-and-trendy-business-model-thats-changing-the-way-people-shop-5

A Long List Of Foods That We Might Never Get To Eat Again

To hell with gold. Start hoarding honey. The bees are dying! Not just honey — start hoarding fruits, vegetables, and nuts too. Because bees pollinate nearly a third of our agricultural food supply, their disappearance should make us all a little jumpy. Here’s a rundown of the problem and its consequences.

Read more: http://upworthy.com/a-long-list-of-foods-that-we-might-never-get-to-eat-again

Bill Nye is pulling out all the stops when he talks about climate change. It’s glorious.

Bill, Bill, Bill, Bill! Bill Nye the Science Guy!

Bill Nye is basically a living touchstone for every millennial science kid (unless you grew up watching Beakman’s World, which had fewer music videos and more giant rat costumes).

On Aug. 22, 2016, New Yorkers may have been able to catch Nye at Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Nye was there for the National Park Foundation’s #FindYourPark event, celebrating the National Park Service’s centennial on Aug. 25.

While he was there, Nye extolled the virtues of the national parks while also calling out one of their biggest threats:climate change.

Though the days of on-air experiments and catchy theme songs are now nearly two decades past, Nye has never stopped speaking out about science and reason. And one of the key features of that mission is to keep people aware of how our planet is changing.

“I just got back from Glacier National Park, and there are only a few glaciers left. And the official word is by 2030, they’ll all be gone,” Nye told The Verge in an interview. “But the park rangers I spoke with a dozen park rangers over the course of a few days no, no, five, six, seven years, certainly by 2025, all the glaciers will be gone.”

Nye has been on a hot streak lately in his fight against climate change. Here’s what he’s been up to:

Nye went on CNN to call out the link between climate change and current natural disasters.

After appearing at Brooklyn Bridge Park, Nye stopped by CNN to call out the link between climate change and flooding in Louisiana.

“For us on my side of this, this is a result of climate change,” Nye told CNN about the recent flooding in Louisiana. “It’s only going to get worse.”

Though we can’t say whether any specific weather phenomenon would or would not have happened without man-made climate changes, it’s true that experts are predicting more frequent and more severe floods, droughts, storms, and heat waves as the atmosphere changes.

He ended the interview with a little jab at CNN, whose anchors haven’t always supported the science.

Back in July, Nye teamed up with Vocativ to debunk climate myths.

Vocativ dredged up some of the most common arguments against climate change science and posed them to Nye in an entertaining if a little heavily produced video. In it he tackles questions about volcanoes, sun cycles, and even pig farts!

In April, Nye put his money where his mouth is while confronting those who reject climate science.

After a meteorologist and climate-change doubter challenged Nye in a 2015 op-ed, Nye offered to bet a total of $20,000 that 2016 would be one of the hottest years ever and that 2010-2020 would be one of the hottest decades.

Looks like he’s being proven right, by the way. 2016 is on pace to be the hottest year in recorded history.

It’s not all doom and gloom, though. Nye knows of a simple thing we can all do to help fight climate change: vote.

“Vote, that’s my message. You have to vote. Take your responsibility to vote seriously,” Nye told The Verge in Brooklyn Bridge Park.

While Nye declined to say who he thought people should vote for, he encouraged people to take the environment into account while voting this year.

Nye was the voice of science in my childhood, and he’s still a tremendous voice of reason today.

His plea for us to vote really matters this year, our elections have some of the most clearly divided candidates on climate change and science in history.

So if things like heading off greater natural disasters and preserving our natural parks matter to you, listen to Bill Nye: This is the year to do something about it.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/bill-nye-is-pulling-out-all-the-stops-when-he-talks-about-climate-change-its-glorious?c=tpstream

That's Nice, Hulk, But What Are You Going To Do About The Buildings You Smashed?

Yes, Mark Ruffalo. I will do whatever your soothing voice of reason suggests.

“Yeah, okay, but I don’t live in New York!” I hear you wail to your computer screen. Worry not! Look what solar energy could do in your state:

Read more: http://upworthy.com/thats-nice-hulk-but-what-are-you-going-to-do-about-the-buildings-you-destroyed

These stunning photos will remind you why trees are dope.

Trees are no joke.

“This better be good.” Photo by Fabian Bromann/Flickr.

Despite our lust for logging, trees aren’t just an abundant well for our material needs. Although, if we’re being honest, trees do make for some pretty sweet stuff.

Paper? Cabins? Musical instruments? Grandmas chair? Half your pins on Pinterest?

(Remember to hug a tree.)

Yes, wood is a super-useful material. But trees are actually really amazing when they’re living and in the ground, too.

There are the obvious things: They clean our water and air which actually has a measurable life-saving effect. And sure, they cool our heat-trapping cities and help to combat global warming.

Need to cool off? Try planting some trees, dude. Photo by Guiana Bolisay/Flickr.

But here are five more subtle ways trees make our lives better:

1. Trees make us happier, more relaxed, and better learners.

Photo by EME/Pixabay.

Studies from Canada to Spain have found that living near a lot of trees can have a positive effect on our mental wellness, attention, and memory.

It’s hard to say whether that’s mostly attributable to exposure to fewer pollutants because of the trees, but some researchers are confident there’s more to it than that.

Stephen Kellert, co-editor of the book, “The Biophilia Hypothesis,” explained the idea in an interview with Yale 360, using the typical office worker as an example:

“Why do people experience flagging morale and fatigue and higher absenteeism in … windowless environments? Why are they far far more likely to try to … incorporate some kind of organic quality theyll have a Sierra Club calendar, theyll have a potted plant. … A lot of this is retrieving things that weve done in the past, intuitively, and instinctually.

2. Trees are the best recruiters for the neighborhood watch.

Photo by JohnPickenPhoto/Flickr.

A 2012 study in Baltimore found that, even when controlling for factors like race and income, areas with more tree coverage report fewer crimes. And while that observation was true for both public and private lands, it was 40% greater for public areas, which is good news for everyone.

That sounds contrary to what we might think that trees provide cover for people who want to make bad decisions. (Watching too many crime thrillers, perhaps?)

But in reality, trees are like whispering crime-fighters. More trees in your community means more people on the streets enjoying the shade, the cleaner air, the comforting rustle of leaves and making it harder for criminals not to be seen.

3. Trees make us less lazy.

Photo by Patrick Gruban/Flickr.

Our psychological attraction to trees also benefits our physical health. A study in Toronto discovered that people who live in areas with high tree density are more likely to be outside and physically active than their tree-deficient neighbors.

The way the researchers present their findings is pretty fascinating. They calculated the number of trees that need to be added to a city block to yield the health benefits possible with either a hefty raise at your job or even a reversal of time:

“Having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. … Having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

4. Trees may not grow money, but they save it.


GIF via quotesgram.

The shade from trees can cut your energy bill by a significant margin. A 2002 study in the journal Environmental Pollution says well-placed trees can cut the energy we use to cool and heat our homes by 25%.

Trees can also save the country billions of dollars in health care costs. Research by the U.S. Forest Service found that trees’ modest impact in air quality improvement (less than 1%) had a massive impact on public health, saving almost $7 billion nationally on treatments for acute respiratory disorders.

5. Lastly, trees are just beautiful. And more natural beauty is never a bad thing.

Go ahead. Get an eyeful.

Rainbow eucalyptus. Photo by Jeff Kubina/Flickr.

Giant sequoias. Photo by Justin Vidamo/Flickr.

Maple tree. Photo by kloniwotski/Flickr.

Weeping willow. Photo by Christine Westerback/geograph.

Jacaranda tree. Photo by Graeme Churchard/Flickr.

Baobab tree. Photo by Bernard Gagnon/Wikimedia Commons.

Cherry blossoms. Photo by Cjbvii/Wikimedia Commons.

Birch trees. Photo by Rein Ketelaars/Flickr.

Cypress trees. Photo by Frank Schulenberg/Flickr.

Dragon blood trees. Photo by Rod Waddington/Wikimedia Commons.

Magnolia trees. Photo by Filipe Fortes/Flickr.

Kapok tree. Photo by Chrishibbard7/Wikimedia Commons.

Like I said trees are no joke.

They cover almost a third of the land on Earth. But in places like the Brazilian Amazon the “the lungs of the planet” and home to over half of the world’s species trees are getting dropped like a bad joke. That’s bad for, well … everyone and everything.

Wanna hug some trees? Here are a couple of ways you can do it: buy sustainably produced products that don’t involve harmful deforestation, and support reforestation projects happening in your community and around the world.

“That’ll do.”

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/these-stunning-photos-will-remind-you-why-trees-are-dope?c=tpstream

You Should See What This Woman Sees Every Day. It's Gorgeous And Really Messed Up.

Forget all the politicians and corporations and talk shows playing tug-of-war in the “what climate change is and isn’t” game. This woman beats all of them. I’m joining her team.

Read more: http://upworthy.com/you-should-see-what-this-woman-sees-every-day-its-gorgeous-and-really-messed-up

An Ape Bites His Handler's Fingers Off, Waits 8 Months, And Then Literally Apologizes

What follows is the amazing story of Kanzi the bonobo. He can recognize 600 words, he can order dinner, and he might even be able to physically speak in English. When Kanzi and his handler get into a disagreement, some pretty crazy things go down.

If you’re curious about the story of Lucy referenced at the beginning of the recording, follow the link below.

Check out the section about Lucy right here.

Read more: http://upworthy.com/an-ape-bites-his-handlers-fingers-off-waits-8-months-and-then-literally-apologizes-7

Catastrophic California Gas Leak Could Take More Than Three Months To Fix

A natural gas leak in Aliso Canyon, California, has been spewing out 50,000 kilograms (110,000 pounds) of gas every hour for more than two months, and officials say it could take another three to four months to bring the situation under control.

The leak first occurred on October 23, when the casing of a gas storage well operated by Southern California (SoCal) Gas failed. Strangely, the cause of this failure is not known, and attempts to stop the flow of gas by pumping liquid directly into the well in order to seal the rupture have been unsuccessful.

In a desperate attempt to arrest the spillage, SoCal Gas has drafted in a number of engineers including several experts who helped to contain the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico to devise a strategy to fix the well. However, a spokesperson for the company told Motherboard that this is unlikely to be achieved before late February at the earliest.

The reason for this delay is that the team has been left with no option but to drill all the way down to the base of the well which sits more than 2,500 meters (8,000 feet) underground in order to locate and fix the source of the leak. Furthermore, the initial shaft will have to be drilled far from the well itself to avoid accidentally igniting the gas and causing an explosion.

The effects of the leak are being monitored by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), which is tracking the volume of gas being released in real-time, focusing particularly on the levels of methane being emitted into the atmosphere. Methane is the major component of natural gas and, according to the EDF, is a powerful short-term climate forcer, with over 80 times the warming power of carbon dioxide in the first 20 years after it is released.

To highlight the catastrophic extent of the leak, the EDF has released a video of the gas emerging from the ground and spewing into the atmosphere. This was created using special infrared cameras, since natural gas is invisible to the naked eye.

Once airborne, methane absorbs the Sun’s heat and warms the atmosphere. It can also cause a number of health issues, and has led to reports of headaches and breathing difficulties from local residents. Two schools have also been temporarily relocated for the upcoming semester, in an attempt to protect youngsters from the effects of the gas.

The Aliso Canyon leak is now the largest single source of methane emissions in California, with EDF’s Timothy O’Connor telling Mashable that it is causing the same amount of damage as eight or nine coal-fired power plants.

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/environment/catastrophic-california-gas-leak-could-take-more-three-months-fix