Germany’s Christoph Kramer Can’t Remember The World Cup Final After Getting Knocked Out

Kramer suffered a head injury against Argentina and attempted to keep playing.

1. Germany’s Cristoph Kramer was knocked out after this nasty collision during the 14th minute of the World Cup Final vs. Argentina. He stayed in the game, but in the 32nd minute, Kramer fell to the ground again and needed to be helped off the field.

vine.co

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REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

Germany’s Christoph Kramer leaves the field in a daze after suffering a head injury vs. Argentina.

3. The 23-year-old midfielder told German paper Die Welt he “can’t really remember much of the game.”

“I don’t know anything at all about the first half. I thought later that I left the game immediately after the tackle. I have no idea how I got to the changing rooms. I don’t know anything else. In my head, the game starts from the second half.”

Via independent.co.uk

4. The blow to Kramer on Sunday is one of several scary head injuries that occurred during the World Cup.

The blow to Kramer on Sunday is one of several scary head injuries that occurred during the World Cup.

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AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko

5. Argentina’s Javier Mascherano collided with Netherlands’ Georginio Wijnaldum during the teams’ semifinal match. He initially staggered off the field, but came back in.

Video available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=XpsUYw9xuyI.

6. Uruguay’s Alvaro Pereirra was knocked unconscious vs. England, but re-entered the game a minute later.

Video available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=Zdb-6L_ozXQ.

7. FIFPro, the World Footballers’ Association, has called on FIFA to ”conduct a thorough investigation into its own competition concussion protocol.

FIFPro, the World Footballers' Association, has called on FIFA to '' conduct a thorough investigation into its own competition concussion protocol. "

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REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/mikehayes/germanys-christoph-kramer-cant-remember-the-world-cup-final

FIFA Clears Mexican Fans In Investigation Of Anti-Gay Chants At World Cup

FIFA says reported incident “is not considered insulting in this particular context.”

1. UPDATE — June 23, 5:00 p.m. ET

2. FIFA has cleared Mexico in an investigation of its country’s fans allegedly chanting homophobic slurs during their matches against Cameroon and Brazil, the New York Times reports.

FIFA has cleared Mexico in an investigation of its country's fans allegedly chanting homophobic slurs during their matches against Cameroon and Brazil, the New York Times reports.

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AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo Andrew Das @AndrewDasNYT

FIFA clears Mexico in case of homophobic chanting. No punishment.

Andrew Das @AndrewDasNYT

In clearing Mexico for homophobic chants, FIFA says incident “is not considered insulting in this particular context.”

5. FIFA opened the investigation last week after it was reported that Mexican supporters were heard chanting “puto,” which is slang for “fag,” “man-whore,” or “coward,” during the team’s first two World Cup games.

FIFA opened the investigation last week after it was reported that Mexican supporters were heard chanting “ puto ,” which is slang for “fag,” “man-whore,” or “coward,” during the team's first two World Cup games.

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AP Photo/Francois Xavier Marit, pool

6. FIFA says it “takes a firm, zero-tolerance stance against any form of discrimination and racism.” FIFA’s disciplinary committee said Sunday it was opening an investigation against German fans who wore blackface to Germany’s match vs. Ghana.

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Instagram user selma_slim, who attended the World Cup, uploaded the picture on Saturday with the caption: “So far I’ve counted 8 Germans in black face. Worst, people are lining up to take pictures with them. Poor form, #Germany. #racism #racists #worldcup”

8. ESPN said it would try to limit chanting being heard during its broadcast of Mexico’s final group stage match vs. Croatia on Monday.

ESPN said it would try to limit chanting being heard during its broadcast of Mexico's final group stage match vs. Croatia on Monday.

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YURI CORTEZ/AFP / Getty Images

9. UPDATE: Mexican fans are still chanting “puto” during the Mexico vs. Croatia match.

vine.co

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/mikehayes/fifa-clears-mexican-fans-in-investigation-of-anti-gay-chants

11 Things You Need To Know About Korea’s World Cup Team

Be the reds!

1. This is their jersey. It “expresses the balance of yin and yang.”

This is their jersey. It "expresses the balance of yin and yang."

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Nike / Via nikeinc.com

Designed by Nike, the jersey references the interlocking shapes of the Taegeuk, the yin yang shape at the center of Korea’s flag, at the top of each sleeve. It’s also got a collar inspired by traditional Korean clothing, and a tab inside the back of the neck with Korean calligraphy that translates to “fighting spirit.”

2. The Republic of Korea, commonly called South Korea, is in East Asia. It’s east of China, west of Japan, and has the world’s fastest Internet.

The Republic of Korea, commonly called South Korea, is in East Asia. It's east of China, west of Japan, and has the world's fastest Internet .

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Via google.com

3. Fans call the team the “Taeguk Warriors,” and call themselves “The Reds.”

Fans call the team the "Taeguk Warriors," and call themselves "The Reds."

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Shaun Botterill / Getty

4. Their first World Cup appearance was in 1954.

Video available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=5AOpLFAq27I.

They lost two games, to Hungary and Turkey. They wouldn’t make their next appearance until 1986.

5. Including 2014, they’ve qualified for the Cup nine times. That makes them Asia’s most frequent visitors to the games.

Including 2014, they've qualified for the Cup nine times. That makes them Asia's most frequent visitors to the games.

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Lars Baron / Getty

6. And in 2002, they co-hosted the Cup with Japan. These were the mascots:

And in 2002, they co-hosted the Cup with Japan. These were the mascots:

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FIFA / Getty

That year, the team came in fourth place.

That year, the team came in fourth place.

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Ben Radford / Getty

They were carried there by extreme home support, and what some have called dubious refereeing in key matches against Italy and Spain.

7. Their most famous player of all time, sweeper Hong Myung-Bo, is also this year’s coach.

Hong Myung-Bo in 1997.

Ben Radford / Getty

Hong Myung-Bo in 2014.

Joosep Martinson / Getty

 

He played for ROK in four consecutive World Cups, including the 2002 cup. Later, he played on the LA Galaxy. After retiring in 2004, he coached Korea’s 2012 Olympics team, which won the bronze. He’s managing this year’s World Cup team following the resignation of Choi Kang-hee, who stepped down in June after Korea performed poorly in the Asian qualification games.

8. This year, they are part of group H.

This year, they are part of group H.

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9. 28-year-old forward Park Chu-Young is one of the team’s stars.

28-year-old forward Park Chu-Young is one of the team's stars.

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Chung Sung-Jun / Getty

10. But look out for 21-year-old striker Son Heung-min.

But look out for 21-year-old striker Son Heung-min.

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Chung Sung-Jun / Getty

During the regular season, he plays in Europe. He was at Hamburg from 2010-2013, and just joined Bayer Leverkusen for a reported 10 million Euro.

soy556.tumblr.com

heungmin.tumblr.com

 

Go get em!

11. Their chances of winning this year:

Click to reveal

Their chances of winning this year:

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correction

A nickname for the team has been corrected.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/naomizeichner/11-things-you-need-to-know-about-koreas-world-cup-team

14 Reasons To Be Excited About The FIFA Women’s World Cup

There are only 326 days left, so don’t stop saying GOOOOOOOOOOAL yet.

1. Teams are still playing to qualify.

Teams are still playing to qualify.

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Lehtikuva / Reuters

The schedule is as follows:South America’s qualifying teams play between September 11 – 28 in Ecuador. Europe’s qualifying teams play between September 17 – 21.Africa’s qualifying teams play between October 11 – 24 in Namibia.North, Central, and the Caribbean’s qualifying teams will be playing between October 16 – 26. Oceania’s qualifying teams will play between October 21 – 25 in Papua New Guinea.

2. Remember this moment?

14 Reasons To Be Excited About The FIFA Women's World Cup

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FIFA TV / Via youtube.com

Fifteen years ago, the U.S. women’s national team won in penalty kicks against China in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup. This was also the last time either of the United States teams’ won in the world cup.

3. FIFA’s newest poster promoting the event is amazing.

FIFA's newest poster promoting the event is amazing.

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FIFA

The poster has been met with positive criticism, signaling that perhaps FIFA is starting to respect women’s soccer more. FIFA designed the poster “to reflect the diversity of Canada’s multicultural society and capture the essence of the great Canadian outdoors.”

4. It marks the return of American superstar Alex Morgan.

It marks the return of American superstar Alex Morgan.

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Cooper Neill / Getty Images

Morgan became the youngest member of the U.S. women’s national team in 2009 and won an Olympic gold medal with the U.S. women’s national team at the 2012 Summer Olympics. She also holds a FIFA record for scoring a goal in the 123rd minute in the match between the U.S. women’s national team against Canada at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

5. And don’t forget Abby Wambach is also coming back!

And don't forget Abby Wambach is also coming back!

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Tim Shaffer / Reuters

Wambach holds the record for being the “second all-time leading scorer in international soccer history.” She has made 167 goals to date in her position as forward.

6. As is Hope Solo!

As is Hope Solo!

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AP Photo/Don Ryan

Solo has played in the 2007 and 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup, won a gold medal with the U.S. women’s national team at the 2008 Summer Olympics, and won another goal medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics. She also holds the record for most shutouts, having saved 71 goals in her career.

7. It features one of the world’s most exciting players, Marta Vieira da Silva from Brazil.

It features one of the world's most exciting players, Marta Vieira da Silva from Brazil.

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Francois Lenoir / Reuters

Silva, who is also known as “Pelé con faldas” (“Pelé with skirts”), has had a storied career from winning silver medals at the 2004 and 2008 Olympics to being named the FIFA World Player of the Year, five times from 2006-2010.

She’s got all the right moves.

14 Reasons To Be Excited About The FIFA Women's World Cup

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youtube.com

8. It is the largest single sporting event for women.

It is the largest single sporting event for women.

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Scanpix Sweden / Reuters

9. And these women have mad skills.

14 Reasons To Be Excited About The FIFA Women's World Cup

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ESPN / Via seattle.sbnation.com

10. Few rivalries are as intense as the U.S. vs. Brazil.

Few rivalries are as intense as the U.S. vs. Brazil.

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Usa Today Sports / Reuters / Reuters

Each time the two teams match up, their games are super intense, as players on both sides work their hardest to dominate the field.

11. The U.S. lost their chance to win in 2011 and is looking to avenge its loss to Japan.

The U.S. lost their chance to win in 2011 and is looking to avenge its loss to Japan.

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Stringer / Reuters

The U.S. team lost in penalty kicks after a tough match between the two teams.

12. It is the largest televised sporting event featuring women.

It is the largest televised sporting event featuring women.

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AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

The 2011 FIFA women’s world cup broke records with hundreds of million viewers watching the games. The U.S. vs. Japan match at the 2011 FIFA women’s world cup alone drew about 13.5 million viewers in the U.S., became ESPN’s most-viewed and highest-rated soccer match at the time, became the sixth most-viewed soccer telecast in U.S. and the second most-watched daytime program in cable history.

13. Every world cup is followed by an immediate rise in youth participation in soccer.

instagram.com

If you have kids, nieces or nephews that developed a love for soccer during this year’s world cup, keep that fever going!

14. It shows that women can be strong, capable, athletic, and the players serve as great role models to young girls.

It shows that women can be strong, capable, athletic, and the players serve as great role models to young girls.

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AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File

Who run the world? Women, always!

14 Reasons To Be Excited About The FIFA Women's World Cup

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FOX / Via britneyspearsgifs.tumblr.com

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/annmariealcantara/reasons-to-be-excited-about-the-fifa-womens-world-cup

Mexico Is Under Investigation For Anti-Gay Slurs At The World Cup

FIFA says it is looking into claims that Mexican fans chanted homophobic slurs during their matches against Cameroon and Brazil.

1. FIFA is investigating claims that Mexican fans chanted anti-gay slurs during their country’s matches against Cameroon and Brazil.

FIFA is investigating claims that Mexican fans chanted anti-gay slurs during their country's matches against Cameroon and Brazil.

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AP Photo/Ricardo Mazalan

2. During an opposing team’s goal kick by the goalkeeper, Mexican supporters are heard chanting “puto,” which is slang for “fag,” “man-whore,” or “coward,” Outsports.com reported.

During an opposing team's goal kick by the goalkeeper, Mexican supporters are heard chanting " puto ," which is slang for "fag," "man-whore," or "coward," Outsports.com reported .

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AP Photo/Petr David Josek

While the word has different interpretations, in this case it is generally used to mock the opponent’s manhood. The chant is often heard at Mexican soccer matches, according to reports.

3. FIFA said it “takes a firm, zero-tolerance stance against any form of discrimination and racism,” and has opened disciplinary proceedings against Mexico for the improper conduct of its spectators.

FIFA said it "takes a firm, zero-tolerance stance against any form of discrimination and racism," and has opened disciplinary proceedings against Mexico for the improper conduct of its spectators.

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YURI CORTEZ/AFP / Getty Images

FARE, a group monitoring fan behavior at the World Cup, also reported complaints of Croatian and Russian fans who unfurled neo-Nazi banners during matches.

A FIFA spokeswoman told the Associated Press that Mexico is the only country against which an inquiry has been opened.

4. “It seems that some fans of some countries will take their hatred halfway around the world,” Piara Powar, a member of FIFA’s anti-racism task force told The Telegraph. “The levels of homophobic abuse at some matches is also totally unacceptable,” he said.

"It seems that some fans of some countries will take their hatred halfway around the world," Piara Powar, a member of FIFA's anti-racism task force told The Telegraph . "The levels of homophobic abuse at some matches is also totally unacceptable," he said.

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AP Photo/Francois Xavier Marit, pool

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/tasneemnashrulla/mexico-is-under-investigation-for-anti-gay-slurs-at-the-worl

World Cup: Substitute Admir Mehmedi scores 121 seconds after entering game [Vine, video]

http://twitter.com/#!/WorldCupPosts/status/478223288921903106

Worth waiting in those crazy long security lines for!

http://twitter.com/#!/TheWorIdCup/status/478222473037901824
http://twitter.com/#!/futbol_y_ya/status/478224804009771009

That’s how to make an impact!

http://twitter.com/#!/BBCSport/status/478225080968032256

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2014/06/15/world-cup-substitute-admir-mehmedi-scores-121-seconds-after-entering-game-vine-video/

Everything We Know So Far About The Corruption And Human Rights Abuses Surrounding FIFA And Qatar’s 2022 World Cup

Bribes, scandals, dangerous working conditions. A timeline.

Qatar 2022 committee/AFP/File

SEBASTIAN DERUNGS/AFP / Getty Images

 

At left, an artist’s rending of one of Qatar’s 2022 World Cup stadiums. At right, Sheikh Mohammed bin Hamad al-Thani, the chairman of the Qatari bid, celebrates after hearing that his country’s bid had been selected.

2. November 2010

FIFA bans two members of its executive committee, Amos Adamu and Reynald Temarii, after they were caught trying to sell their votes for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups.

3. December 2010

FIFA awards the 2022 World Cup to Qatar, which beat out the United States by a vote of 14–8 for the bid. The victory comes despite warnings that temperatures in Qatar can reach 120 degrees in the summer months, when the World Cup is held.

“We know it would be a bold gamble and an exciting prospect — but with no risk,” bid Chief Executive Hassan al-Thawadi tells reporters. “Heat is not and will not be an issue.”

Qatar promises to build significant infrastructure for the tournament, including nine new stadiums. Officials estimate the cost at $50 billion.

4. May 2011

FIFA President Sepp Blatter denies that FIFA is struggling amid continuing allegations that some voters accepted bribes during the bid process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. “Football is not in a crisis, only some difficulties,” he says. He runs unopposed and is elected to his fourth term as president of FIFA.

5. May 2012

Qatari officials confirm that alcohol will be sold within the country during the World Cup, but leave questions about whether or not it will also be sold inside stadiums. The country currently allows alcohol sales inside some hotels, but not at soccer matches.

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AFP / Getty Images

A migrant worker walks as he works on a construction site in Doha, Qatar.

7. June 2012

Sharan Burrow, general secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation, warns of dangerous working conditions in Qatar. “Without genuine legal protection and union rights, more workers will die building the World Cup stadiums than players will play in the World Cup itself,” he says. The ITUC also reports that some workers are being denied time off until they have completed a year of work — and even then are being given only three days of leave per year.

8. April 2013

A report from a United Nation agency, the International Labour Organization, says that 94% of all workers in Qatar are migrant workers, and many may be victims of human trafficking. Some migrant workers are forced to pay recruiters a fee — on average, $550 — just to secure a job in Qatar. The ILO reports that those jobs are often not as high paying as promised, or may be entirely different from the jobs promised before leaving their home countries.

9. August 2013

The Economist writes that worker conditions are unlikely to improve in Qatar: “The migrant workers’ lot is unlikely to improve until the reform of the kafala system, whereby workers are beholden to the employers who sponsored their visas.”

10. September 2013

The Guardian reports that at least 44 Nepalese workers died during the summer while building infrastructure for the World Cup. Workers say they have not been paid for months, and have been denied access to food and water. The Guardian describes the conditions as “modern-day slavery.”

The International Trade Union Confederation estimates that more than 4,000 migrant workers could die in Qatar while working on construction projects for the World Cup.

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ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP / Getty Images

FIFA President Sepp Blatter, the executive taking most of the criticism for the bid process behind the 2022 World Cup.

12. October 2013

Blatter says a decision on when to play the 2022 World Cup may not come until 2015. The tournament is expected to move to the winter months, as temperatures will be too hot to play soccer during the summer.

13. November 2013

Amnesty International releases a report detailing the “severe exploitation” of workers in Qatar. It notes that workers in Qatar cannot change jobs — or leave the country — without the permission of their employer, effectively leaving workers enslaved. (Employers also hold their workers’ passports, making escape even more difficult.)

French player Zahir Belounis — then playing for a Qatari team — writes a letter in The Guardian claiming that after a legal dispute with his team, he has not been allowed to leave the country and return to France. “This system is slowly killing me and many other people risk suffering in the same way,” he says.

14. January 2014

FIFA Secretary General Jerome Valcke announces that the World Cup will not be played in the summer due to excessive heat. Just hours later, FIFA releases a statement saying no decision has been made.

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AP Photo/Shirley Bahadur

Mohamed bin Hammam, the man at the center of the bribery allegations in Qatar.

16. March 2014

The Daily Telegraph reports that former FIFA Vice President Jack Warner was paid $1.2 million by a Qatari company owned by Mohamed bin Hammam, a member of FIFA’s executive committee. The money was paid just weeks after Warner cast his vote for Qatar to host the 2022 World Cup.

The International Trade Union Confederation releases a report saying at least 1,200 migrant workers have already died in Qatar since the World Cup was awarded to the country. The ITUC also calls on Qatar to end kafala and allow workers to unionize.

17. May 2014

Blatter says it was a “mistake” to award the 2022 World Cup to Qatar, citing the heat that will likely force the tournament’s move to winter months.

Qatari officials announce that they will eliminate the country’s kafala system for migrant workers, pending a vote. The Guardian reports that there will be significant opposition from businesses to any change in employment laws.

JUNG YEON-JE/AFP / Getty Images

Karim Jaafar/AFP/File

 

At left, Qatari midfielder Khalfan Ibrahim Alkhalfan. At right, Qatari fans in Doha.

19. June 2014

The Sunday Times reports that bin Hammam — who was named in March as the man who paid $1.2 million in bribes for Jack Warner’s vote — paid out more than $5 million to FIFA executives and voters in order to win the World Cup bid for his country. Bin Hammam also reportedly paid the legal fees for Reynald Temarii, who was banned by FIFA in November 2010 for trying to sell his vote.

Investigators finish their internal investigation into the bid process behind the 2022 World Cup, and announce that they will turn over all evidence to FIFA for consideration.

A John Oliver rant on his HBO show, Last Week Tonight, brings new worldwide attention toward the corruption of FIFA and problems with the 2022 World Cup.

ESPN’s Jorge Ramos reports that FIFA has told the United States to prepare for the World Cup if Qatar is stripped of its bid. U.S. Soccer officials deny the report just hours later.

The Sunday Times reports that FIFA executives ignored an internal report predicting a “high risk” of a terrorist attack during a Qatari World Cup, with the chance of a “major incident” during the competition. Qatar was the only country rated as a high-risk country. In the same report, which was given to executives in the month before the selection of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, Russia was rated as a moderate risk, but was still awarded the 2018 World Cup.

The New York Times reports that Blatter may run for a fifth term as FIFA president.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/danoshinsky/corruption-and-human-rights-abuses-in-qatar

You Can See The World Cup From Space

Bicycle kicks are so much easier in zero gravity.

1. The World Cup kicked off in Brazil, seen here from the International Space Station (ISS).

instagram.com

You can see three World Cup 2014 stadium cities: Arena de São Paulo, Estadio Mineirao (Belo Horizonte), and Estadio Do Maracana (Rio de Janeiro).

2. And here are the host cities as seen from a satellite.

instagram.com

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) senses light in a range of wavelengths, and unlike a single-exposure camera, it scans a scene repeatedly to form the image.

3. U.S. and German astronauts will be cheering on their teams from aboard the ISS, 230 miles above Earth.

instagram.com

Especially in a few weeks when their homelands compete head to head.

4. More like Out-Of-This-World-Cup, amiright?

You Can See The World Cup From Space

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Via fanpop.com

Let the matches begin!

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/kasiagalazka/you-can-see-the-world-cup-from-space