Always Keep Vinegar In Your Home For These Awesome Reasons

Maybe it’s the fact it smells terrible or is pretty much useless when it comes to our daily lives, but that bottle of vinegar rarely gets opened.

Sure, you might occasionally use it in recipes, but since grocery stores generally refuse to sell vinegar in quantities less than a liter, the bottle often sits unused for long periods of time.

That is, until today!

These helpful tips will show you just how powerful that bottle can be. Not only will you use the entire thing up in no time, you’ll probably soon head back to the store to buy even more.

I was so wrong — vinegar very well may be the most useful ingredient I own!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/vinegar-uses/

One Man’s Mission to Build America’s Appetite for Artisanal Food

Marketer Tom Monday has always been inspired by independent enterprises — businesses or individuals that are fueled by an unflappable passion for what they do and who they can reach, not just a desire to get rich.

For more than a decade, Monday labored in the music industry in a variety of roles to help bring exposure to smaller (but no less important) performers.

Then, in 2011, he moved onto a more corporatized position in the field, a decision he would later regret.

“It was soul-crushing,” Monday tells Mashable. “I had a moment when I said, ‘I have to go back and work with people who are making things that are interesting and that I care about.'”

“Telling their story”

In 2012, Monday decamped from his job and turned his complete attention to a new passion that he and his professional and social circles were buzzing about: Helping small-batch food and drink producers establish a foothold in American kitchens.

“There are a lot of similarities between independent music and independent food and drink, and a lot of my friends started talking about food and drink the way they used to talk about music,” he says. “They started wanting to not so much turn me onto a band, but turn me onto a small batch bourbon they just encountered, or a food truck or a pop-up shop.”

The problem for many independent brands, however, is marketing. While they can go from their kitchen to a farmers market, they often have trouble navigating grocery chains and implementing customer acquisition strategies. Monday, who spent more than a dozen years in marketing, could help.

The first step, he told them, was to tell their story, which would justify charging a premium for their product. Without a story about the maker, and where the product comes from, most small-batch producers struggle to attract the attention of customers who might be tempted to purchase a cheaper, mass-produced alternative.

“People won’t pay premium for something if they don’t know a lot about it and haven’t been able to experience it,” Monday says. “It’s hard for people to tell their own story, so one of the most exciting things we can do is have a good product from someone who has a good story but hasn’t been able to tell it yet.”

Since 2013, under the name Small Batch America, Monday has helped dozens of small brands, like Mast Brothers Chocolate, Grady’s Cold Brew and Sour Puss Pickles, tell their stories.

He’s done so using many of the connections he made in the music industry. Backstage at concerts and festivals across the country, Monday has brought small-batch products to musicians who pride themselves on supporting small producers. He’s even been able to find a home for some of the products he represents in the green room of the The Daily Show.

“One of my goals is to get venues and festivals to care more about what they’re serving their guests,” he says. “It seems silly to me that you’d be serving interesting and creative people uninteresting and uncreative food.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2014/09/09/small-batch-america-video/

Michael Phelps Ate An Entire Pound Of Pasta To ‘Recover’ After Winning Gold

Have you ever swam a 4×100 race at the Olympics and immediately scarfed down a pound of spaghetti?

Yeah, I haven’t done that either. But that’s exactly what Michael Phelps did to celebrate winning his 23rd gold medal at the Olympics this week.

Eating that much pasta would be an accomplishment for anyone, but for Phelps, it’s necessary after using so much energy in an intense race. (A pound of pasta, by the way, is what four normal people could eat.)

Unfortunately, Phelps isn’t much of a spaghetti person. He had to force himself to do it,and it’s one of his many interesting recovery methods.

If a pound of spaghetti sounds like a lot to you, it’s actually cake for Phelps. Back in 2008, Phelps ate a whopping 12,000 calories a day that included indulgences like a three fried eggs sandwiches with a ton of cheese at breakfast, two large ham and cheese sandwiches on white bread at lunch andentire pizzas for dinner.

He also guzzled 1,000-calorie energy drinks.

Damn. Just keep in mind, people, Phelps is not an average human. He’s probably earned each of the thousands of calories he consumes on the reg.

Since 2008, he’s cut back. But, he still ate a pound of pasta for dinner after the big event.

Phelps said,

I tried to do as much as I could, get my lactate cleared, had a massage, had an ice bath, eat […] I think I had a pound of spaghetti, and I am not a spaghetti fan. I forced myself to eat it.

I’m not sure which is weirder: the fact Phelps ate total crap when he was 22 and is still crushing at the Olympics or the fact he doesn’t like spaghetti.


Subscribe to Elite Daily’s official newsletter,The Edge, for more stories you don’t want to miss.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/news/michael-phelps-pound-pasta-gold/1577121/

Give The Gift Of Food This Holiday Season With These Tasty Treats

We all have that one person on our Christmas list that is just impossible to shop for.

On my list, that person is my father. He likes to say that Christmas is just another day and that it has the emotional appeal of watching paint dry, so you can imagine how incredibly difficult it is to pick out gifts for him.

While my father couldn’t care less about Christmas, he LOVES to eat. So instead of purchasing something that he won’t use, I’m going to fill his stomach with holiday cheer this year. If you still have a question mark next to someone’s name on your list, check out these 20 gift ideas. They’re all 100 percent edible, and they’ll turn any Scrooge into a jolly old Saint Nick.

1. Give them their favorite cookie recipe in a jar.

2. Warm their heart (and their stomach) with these decorative soup mix ornaments.

3. Your friends and family won’t be salty if you give them their very own jar of homemade caramel goodness.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/edible-holiday-gifts/

This Is What Airplane Food Looks Like In First Class Vs Economy All Over The World

First-class flying definitely has it perks.

But if you thought boarding early and scoring some extra leg room were the only benefits of buying a first-class ticket, you clearly havent seen the airplane foodbeing served on the other side of the silver-lined curtain.

Yep, when it comes to dining in the sky, there tends to be a pretty big disparity between the fancy five-course meals given to privileged passengers and the dog food-like slop served to all of the sad peasants stuffed back ineconomy.

If youve ever wondered just how much the in-flight mealsdiffer betweendifferent airlines and ticketclasses, youve come to the right place.

We recently scoured the Instagram feeds of foodies who travel all over the world in order to get a general idea of what airplane food looks like in every single class, and all I have to say is I want to be one of the rich peopleup at the front of the plane.

No really, once you compare thesilver spoon snacks in first class to your crappy coach cuisine, youll basically want to scream louder than the baby thats been crying you since takeoff.

Check out the pictures below to see the differences between first, business and economy class meals on a variety of airlines across the globe.

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Read more: http://elitedaily.com/envision/airplane-food-around-the-world/1592304/

Pizza Expert Reviews Frozen Pizzas

Pizza Expert Reviews Frozen Pizzas

Scott has a job most people dream about. Everyday, he travels around New York and other big cities taste testing and reviewing the best pizzerias in the world. He eats pizzas, judges pizzas, and even writes for a pizza magazine. But today he has teamed up with BuzzFeed to instead review some not so great frozen pizzas to see how they compare to the best. 

 

Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2014/07/28/pizza-expert-reviews-frozen-pizzas/

The 10 Most Disgusting Things Found in Fast Food!

Maybe you shouldn’t watch this while eating. Otherwise this trending video by Matthew Santoro contains interesting facts, absurd ingredients and over 500,000 views within a day.

“You may never eat fast food again after this…”

Read more: https://www.viralviralvideos.com/2017/01/24/10-disgusting-things-found-fast-food/