Artist Spends Hours Arranging Natural Objects Into Stunning Mandalas, Leaves Them For You To Find

Nature is beautiful as it is, but James Brunt is constantly finding new ways to make it look even more appealing. James creates artworks using natural objects he finds around his home in Yorkshire, England, and their intricacy will please both your eyes and your soul.

From rocks and twigs to leaves and even berries, Brunt arranges the materials into spirals, concentric circles, and other detailed patterns. James regularly photographs his work and besides viewing the images on social media, his fans are also welcome to join him as he works. Scroll down to review Brunt’s work, and if your eyes are left wanting more, check out these satisfying arrangements of everyday objects by Emily Blincoe.

Straw Land Art Festival in Croatia (Picture Gallery)

The 6th Straw Land Art Festival was recently held near the village of Lug, on a crop field near the nature park Kopacki rit, in Baranja region, north east Croatia.

It’s an annual international event aimed to promote straw sculpting and land art. To summit up – sorta like Burning Man made with straws.

Here are some of the bizarre sculptures from this year’s and past events.

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival
Photo: sbonline.net

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival
Photo: Darko Matovac/panoramio.com

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival
Photo: Igor Valeri/dpreview.com

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival

Straw Sculptures - Slama Land Art FestivalStraw Sculptures - Slama Land Art Festival
Photo: valkaireka.blogspot.com

Sources: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 |

Epic Sahara Desert Art Installation Still Exists After 17 Years And Is Visible From Google Earth

The word “epic” is thrown around a lot these days to describe art or other media that people like. If you want a good idea of what “epic” really looks like, however, you need to see Desert Breath, a truly epic art installation near the Red Sea in Egypt. 17 years after its completion, this mystical desert spiral is still clearly visible on Google Earth. [Read more…]

The work, by D.A.S.T. Arteam, is of truly epic proportions – between 1995 and 1997, 8,000 m3 of sand were displaced to create an art installation that occupies 100,000 m2 of desert between the Red Sea and a range of ancient volcanic mountains in Egypt’s Eastern Desert region. It consists of a massive spiral of cones and pits that spiral out of a central pool of water. As the walking viewer approaches the center, the gradually smaller cones will make the viewer will feel as though they’re growing larger.

The team of artists consists of installation artist Danae Stratou, industrial designer and architect Alexandra Stratou, and architect Stella Constantinides. Located between the sea and a body of mountains at the point where the immensity of the sea meets the immensity of the desert, the work functions on two different levels in terms of viewpoint: from above as a visual image, and from the ground, walking the spiral pathway, a physical experience,” explains the team. “In our mind’s eye the desert was a place where one experiences infinity.”

Source: danaestratou.com

Making of:

report

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/epic-sand-art-installation-desert-breath-dast-arteam/

3D Sand Piano Beach Art by Jamie Harkins

3d sand piano beach art by jamie harkins (4)

Sand artist Jamie Harkins (featured previously) is back with a new temporary artwork, a sand piano etched into the beach. The anamorphic land art plays with perspective, elongating lines and distorting the image so it appears 3-dimensional when viewed from a specific angle. For more, check out Jamie’s website and Facebook page.

3d sand piano beach art by jamie harkins (2)

Artwork by JAMIE HARKINS
Website | Facebook

3d sand piano beach art by jamie harkins (1)

Artwork by JAMIE HARKINS
Website | Facebook

3d sand piano beach art by jamie harkins (5)

Artwork by JAMIE HARKINS
Website | Facebook

3d sand piano beach art by jamie harkins (3)

Artwork by JAMIE HARKINS
Website | Facebook

Adorable Footprints Made from Stones

Originally from Scotland but now living in South East England, amateur photographer Iain Blake found these wonderful stones and made footprints out of them. Not only are the stones themselves great finds (and beautifully arranged), but the photographs are well captured and the composition is just wonderful.

From paws to footprints of all sizes, this is a fun series and a fun project you can do yourself! To see the entire series, check out the 26-picture gallery on Flickr. For prints, head over to 500px for canvas prints and digital downloads.

[via My Modern Met and PetaPixel]

1.

Follow the Leader

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

2.

Little Big Foot

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

3.

United Colours

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

4.

Week 1 - "Direction"

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

5.

13 Foot Square

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

6.

Stepping Stones

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

7.

Leave Only Footprints

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

8.

Three in a Bed

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

9.

Ying Yang Feet

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

10.

Spot The Difference

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

11.

Step Forward

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

12.

Small, Medium, Large

Artwork and Photography by Iain Blake | Prints Available

Artist Plants 1.2-Acre Field To Recreate Van Gogh’s 1889 Painting ‘Olive Trees’

64-year-old artist Stan Herd transformed a field on the Eagan, Minnesota, Thomson Reuters campus into Van Gogh’s 1889 Painting “Olive Trees.” Herd’s first ‘earthwork’ was created in 1981; this latest project took six months, covers 1.2-acres, and involved weeks of mowing, digging, and planting. It was sponsored by the Minneapolis Institute of Art, and can be seen from the air near the Minneapolis airport.

“It’s an iteration of Van Gogh’s painting writ large in native plants and materials,” Herd told Star Media. “It never looks like I want it to…I bit off a lot here, to try to pull this off. A few of the plants were eaten by deer, and a few were blown over. But that’s the dance of nature,” he added in a separate interview with MPRNews.

After 6 months of mowing, digging, and planting, Stan Herd finally completed his 1.2-acre “earthwork”


“It’s an iteration of Van Gogh’s painting writ large in native plants and materials”


“The opportunity to engage with one of my favorite artists in the world was pretty unique for me”

Image credits: Thomson Reuters

“A few of the plants were eaten by deer, and a few were blown over. But that’s the dance of nature”

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/land-art-painting-field-van-gogh-olive-trees-stan-herd/