Watch Pussy Riot Get Whipped By Cossacks In Sochi

21st Century Russia.

1. One day after they were detained in the Olympic city of Sochi, several members of the opposition punk group Pussy Riot were accosted by Cossacks while trying to perform a protest stunt on Wednesday.

One day after they were detained in the Olympic city of Sochi, several members of the opposition punk group Pussy Riot were accosted by Cossacks while trying to perform a protest stunt on Wednesday.

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

2. Six members of the punk protest group were attacked by Cossacks while trying to launch a performance that included shouting “Putin will teach you how to love the motherland.”

Six members of the punk protest group were attacked by Cossacks while trying to launch a performance that included shouting "Putin will teach you how to love the motherland."

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

3. Cossacks are an ultra-Orthodox group that date back to 15th Century Russia. Their popularity has soared as President Vladimir Putin turns increasingly conservative, and they were called in to do extra security in Sochi during the Olympics.

Cossacks are an ultra-Orthodox group that date back to 15th Century Russia. Their popularity has soared as President Vladimir Putin turns increasingly conservative, and they were called in to do extra security in Sochi during the Olympics.

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

4. Nadya Tolokonnikova and Masha Alyokhina, recently released from prison after serving 21 months on charges of “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred,” were among the two Pussy Riot members attacked.

Nadya Tolokonnikova and Masha Alyokhina, recently released from prison after serving 21 months on charges of "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred," were among the two Pussy Riot members attacked.

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

5. Around a dozen Cossacks, as well as undercover police, broke up their performance.

Around a dozen Cossacks, as well as undercover police, broke up their performance.

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

6. Cossacks also attacked photographers at the scene.

Cossacks also attacked photographers at the scene.

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

7. They used force to stop the protest.

They used force to stop the protest.

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

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AP Photo/Morry Gash

LINK

What Does Pussy Riot Mean Now?

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/miriamelder/watch-pussy-riot-get-whipped-by-cossacks-in-sochi

Robot Hamster Trolls Russian Policeman

A new robot toy hamster is trending is Russia that repeats back whatever you say in a high-pitched hamster voice while bobbing up and down. This Russian driver was playing with his hamster when he was pulled over for a routine check.

But when the cop started asking him questions, the hamster simply repeated him. The driver couldn’t help but laugh. 

Finally, the policeman says, “Who is talking? Is it the hamster? Okay, everything looks fine, next time, no talking animals.”

 

Read more: http://www.viralviralvideos.com/2013/03/03/robot-hamster-trolls-russian-police/

Photographer Documents Stark Reality Of People Living In The Woods.

We all feel lonely sometimes, but no matter how bleak things in our lives might seem, we usually aren’t as bad off as we think. Most of us have a foundation of friends or family to help us in times of need, but that’s not the case for the subjects of these photographs.

Russian photographer Daninla Tkachenko sheds light on an isolated population who decided to shed civilization and society completely by living in the woods. With makeshift houses and tattered clothing, the vivid portraits paint a totally different perspective on life. Take a look.

(H/T: My Modern Met.)
You can find more of the Tkachenko’s powerful photography on her website and even purchase them in her book, Escape.

Be sure to share the stirring photos with your friends using the buttons below.

Read more: http://viralnova.com/alone-woods/

Top Ukrainian Diplomat Calls Putin A “Dickhead”

Russian officials are furious at Ukrainian foreign minister Andrii Deshchytsia. “He’s bad at controlling himself,” one wrote. “He might get wasted and barf without warning all over the U.N. General Assembly.”

Hundreds of Ukrainians rioted outside the Russian embassy in Kiev on Saturday night after pro-Russian separatists in the country’s troubled east shot down an army transport plane, killing all 49 on board.

Hundreds of Ukrainians rioted outside the Russian embassy in Kiev on Saturday night after pro-Russian separatists in the country's troubled east shot down an army transport plane, killing all 49 on board.

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SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP / Getty Images

The protesters demanded that Russia admit to aiding the separatists, charges Moscow denies, and take steps to end the conflict in the east.

Євромайдан @Dbnmjr

Посольство РФ около 20-00.

Russia was outraged.

Facebook Post.

Facebook: MIDRussia

Ukraine’s acting foreign minister, Andrii Deshchytsia, attempted to calm protesters down. “We must fulfill our international obligations, including defending the right of Russia to have an embassy in Ukraine,” he said.

Ukraine's acting foreign minister, Andrii Deshchytsia, attempted to calm protesters down. "We must fulfill our international obligations, including defending the right of Russia to have an embassy in Ukraine," he said.

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YURIY KIRNICHNY/AFP / Getty Images

Those in the furious crowd weren’t having it. “Did I say that I am against you protesting? I am for you protesting,” Deshchytsia continued. “I’m ready to stand here with you and say, ‘Russia, get out of Ukraine! Yes, ‘Putin khuilo,’ he added.

Video available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=kac73Ks_Yqo.

Deshchytsia was referring to a popular song that calls Putin a khuilo, which literally means “fucking hideous effigy” or “giant cock” but is best translated as “dickhead” or “fucker.” Protesters then sang “Putin khuilo!” as Deshchytsia looked on, slightly bemused. youtube.com

The song has swept the country since pro-unity soccer fans debuted it before a match in the city of Kharkiv in March.

Video available at: http://youtube.com/watch?v=tX96urnpkuk.

There’s even a campaign to get foreign fans to sing it during Russia’s matches at the World Cup in Brazil. (Ukraine didn’t qualify.) youtube.com

By Sunday, things had calmed down in Kiev.

Anna G @LadyGuri

Прямо сейчас у посольства Украины в Москве начинают собираться люди с требованием #НетФашизму

Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov told his French counterpart Laurent Fabius that he was “over the inaction of the Kiev authorities who allowed the rioting outside the Russian embassy,” according to a ministry statement.

Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov told his French counterpart Laurent Fabius that he was "over the inaction of the Kiev authorities who allowed the rioting outside the Russian embassy," according to a ministry statement.

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Police were slow to intervene to stop the violence, though Ukraine’s foreign ministry later claimed that several instigators had been arrested. Most of the job protecting the embassy was done by “self-defense units” left over from protests that overthrew disgraced former president Viktor Yanukovych, a Russia ally, in February. SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP / Getty Images

Lavrov filed an official note of protest against the “bacchanalia” to Kiev on Sunday. Konstantin Dolgov, one of his deputies, said the incident “just goes to show the political culture, or rather, lack thereof, of the people in power in Kiev.”

Lavrov filed an official note of protest against the "bacchanalia" to Kiev on Sunday. Konstantin Dolgov, one of his deputies, said the incident "just goes to show the political culture, or rather, lack thereof, of the people in power in Kiev."

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Lavrov famously once asked David Milliband, then UK foreign minister, “Who the fuck are you to lecture me?!” during a discussion of the 2008 Russo-Georgian War. Yves Herman / Reuters / Reuters

Russia’s ambassador to Ukraine, Mikhail Zurabov, told state TV that the attack on the embassy had been “carefully planned.”

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“Poroshenko needs to change his foreign minister,” Russian parliamentary foreign affairs chief Alexey Pushkov wrote on Twitter. “He’s bad at controlling himself. He might get wasted without warning and barf all over the U.N. General Assembly.”

Алексей Пушков @Alexey_Pushkov

Порошенко надо бы сменить своего министра иностр.дел. Он себя плохо контролирует.А то нажрется,неровен час, и всю Генассамблею ООН заблюет

Western governments also condemned the riot and called on Ukraine to uphold its international obligations to protect the embassy.

Western governments also condemned the riot and called on Ukraine to uphold its international obligations to protect the embassy.

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SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP / Getty Images

But the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine — who agreed when his boss, assistant secretary of state Victoria Nuland, said “Fuck the EU” in a leaked phone conversation in February — praised Deshchtysia for helping end the riot.

Geoffrey Pyatt @GeoffPyatt

@zikifa @j_parus Agree. Great credit to @ADeshchytsia for seeking to defuse a dangerous situation. A skilled diplomat and credit to #Ukraine

“Oof, they shouldn’t be legalizing weed,” Russia Today head Margarita Simonyan wrote of Pyatt’s comment.

Маргарита Симоньян @M_Simonyan

Американский посол про известную сентенцию Дешицы написал, что Дешица проявил себя как искусный дипломат. Ох, зря они травку легализуют.

“My statement was a way to show my discontent peacefully,” Deshchtysia told Russian radio, before backtracking and claiming he hadn’t made a “statement.”

"My statement was a way to show my discontent peacefully," Deshchtysia told Russian radio, before backtracking and claiming he hadn't made a "statement."

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“The main thing was that we managed to stop the violence and provocations outside the Russian embassy,” Deshchytsia wrote on Sunday. “But if Russian aggression continues, it’s going to be harder to do.”

Andrii Deshchytsia @ADeshchytsia

Головне, що вчора вдалося зупинити насильство і провокації біля посольства РФ. Але,якщо російська агресія триватиме,це буде робити все важче

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/maxseddon/top-ukrainian-diplomat-calls-putin-a-dickhead

The Resistance will NOT be happy: Top Democrat updates where Trump/Russia probe stands

CNN interviewed Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) Sunday morning to discuss the investigation into any ties between theTrump campaign and Russia. Warner reported that, despite the best efforts of those investigating to find something, a “smoking gun” has not emerged.

Read more: http://twitchy.com/jacobb-38/2017/06/04/the-resistance-will-not-be-happy-top-democrat-updates-where-trumprussia-probe-stands/

What the Truck!? (Video)

All I can say – it’s Russia.

UPDATE: was forced to switch the embed after the first one got removed from youtube. Original upload still unknown. Spotted here

24 Mysterious And Chilling Pictures Of Abandoned Buildings From The Soviet Union

British photographer Rebecca Litchfield travelled across the former USSR to capture these remarkable images of decaying public buildings in deserted towns. Taken from the book Soviet Ghosts.

1. Pripyat in Ukraine, near the Chernobyl power plant, was abandoned after the disaster in 1986.

Pripyat in Ukraine, near the Chernobyl power plant, was abandoned after the disaster in 1986.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

When the Chernobyl was built in 1970, many of the facility’s staff were housed in the nearby city of Pripyat. Around 50,000 people once lived here, spread across 160 buildings that had contained a total of 13,400 apartments.

Trees and shrubs are the only things left living there, as structures continue to decay and crumble.

2. Pripyat’s Hospital No. 126 consists of five large buildings, each of them six storeys high.

Pripyat’s Hospital No. 126 consists of five large buildings, each of them six storeys high.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

3. After the town was abandoned, doctors left medical equipment, beds, bottles, babies’ cribs and other equipment to rust.

After the town was abandoned, doctors left medical equipment, beds, bottles, babies’ cribs and other equipment to rust.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

4. The town had three indoor swimming pools, two sports stadiums, 35 playgrounds, 15 primary schools, five secondary schools and a technical college.

The town had three indoor swimming pools, two sports stadiums, 35 playgrounds, 15 primary schools, five secondary schools and a technical college.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

5. There are several kindergartens in Pripyat, still full of toys and with beds still made, among the gas masks that were designed to protect the children in the case of a chemical attack or disaster.

There are several kindergartens in Pripyat, still full of toys and with beds still made, among the gas masks that were designed to protect the children in the case of a chemical attack or disaster.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

6. Pripyat’s Luna Park, with its Ferris wheel and bumper cars, was scheduled to open as a part of the May Day celebrations in 1986.

Pripyat’s Luna Park, with its Ferris wheel and bumper cars, was scheduled to open as a part of the May Day celebrations in 1986.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

But the Chernobyl disaster happened days before its opening. However, people did make use of it in the hours before an official evacuation was ordered.

7. A tuberculosis hospital in Russia lies empty.

A tuberculosis hospital in Russia lies empty.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

In the captions in her book, photgrapher Rebecca Litchfield says of these hospitals throughout the USSR: “Even in the realm of health, the state would seek to control and monitor its citizens, and use surgeries, clinics and hospitals to further their political aims, even to the extent of deploying spies alongside medical staff.”

8. The trip to Russia to take these photographs wasn’t a simple affair.

The trip to Russia to take these photographs wasn't a simple affair.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

“Not many explorers travel to Russia,” says Litchfield in the publicity material for the book. “Where the rules are very different, locations are heavily guarded and a strong military presence exists everywhere. There are serious consequences for getting caught.

“We managed to stay hidden for all of the trip, we maximised our stealthiness, ducking and diving into bushes and sneaking past sleeping security. But on day three our good fortune ran out as we visited a top secret radar installation. After walking through the forest, mosquitos attacking us from all directions, we saw the radar and made our way towards it, but just metres away suddenly we were joined by military and they weren’t happy..”

9. But she says she’s not trying to make any political points about the Communist era.

But she says she's not trying to make any political points about the Communist era.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

“I refrain from having personal opinions about the era and try to remain relatively neutral,” she says. “Whilst the period had bad times, the people living in the communities still got on with life and also had good times, it was not a period of pure black and white and so my aim of the book was to just capture it as it was now.”

10. Many Soviet-era cinemas lie abandoned throughout Russia.

Many Soviet-era cinemas lie abandoned throughout Russia.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

Litchfield says: “Cinema was quickly seized upon under Communism and nowhere more so than in the Soviet Union as an important tool for political education and indoctrination.

“Soviet filmmakers, such as Sergei Eisenstein and Dziga Vertov, remain amongst the most influential directors of all time; largely by virtue of their pioneering use of ‘montage’ techniques.”

11. Poland is also full of abandoned buildings from the Communist era – such as this hospital.

Poland is also full of abandoned buildings from the Communist era – such as this hospital.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

12. Skrunda was a secret town in Latvia, housing a Soviet radar station designed to monitor all of Western Europe.

Skrunda was a secret town in Latvia, housing a Soviet radar station designed to monitor all of Western Europe.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

13. Although its location was kept secret, eventually it became a residential town with 60 buildings, including a gym, a school and a theatre.

Although its location was kept secret, eventually it became a residential town with 60 buildings, including a gym, a school and a theatre.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

As Litchfield explains in the book, however: “Once Latvia had gained back its independence, the Soviets were given four years to dismantle the radars. The entire town was sold at auction for just 17,000 Lats (around £20,000) but as of 2013 nothing has yet been done with the site.”

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

15. Latvia has several abandoned radio telescopes, such the two left at Irbene, Cold War relics from a time when intercepting Western satellite signals was a top priority.

Latvia has several abandoned radio telescopes, such the two left at Irbene, Cold War relics from a time when intercepting Western satellite signals was a top priority.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

There were originally six telescopes but four were dismantled and the remaining two incapacitated.

16. The entire area was once forbidden – people needed to seek special permission to visit Irbene and its surrounding towns.

The entire area was once forbidden – people needed to seek special permission to visit Irbene and its surrounding towns.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

“Irbene was so secretive in fact, that the public only found out about it when the site was officially revealed in 1993; long after the Soviets had left,” says Litchfield.

17. This is the swimming pool at the Soviet Union’s headquarters in Germany. Trains ran daily from here and Moscow.

This is the swimming pool at the Soviet Union's headquarters in Germany. Trains ran daily from here and Moscow.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

18. It was built by the Germans but took over by Russia on 20 April 1945, with fighting leaving some 120 dead.

It was built by the Germans but took over by Russia on 20 April 1945, with fighting leaving some 120 dead.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

19. There were 800 people living here by 1953 and as many as 30,000 soliders and 75,000 civilians in the surrounding area.

There were 800 people living here by 1953 and as many as 30,000 soliders and 75,000 civilians in the surrounding area.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

The Russians left behind weapons, ammunition, bomb parts and chemical waste when they left.

20. This mural still stares out from the wall of a Soviet pilot school in what was the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany.

This mural still stares out from the wall of a Soviet pilot school in what was the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

21. Milovice in the Czech Republic has been a military site since the early 1990s, in the hands of Czechoslovakia, Germany and then the Soviets, who took control in 1968.

Milovice in the Czech Republic has been a military site since the early 1990s, in the hands of Czechoslovakia, Germany and then the Soviets, who took control in 1968.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

Hundreds of families lived here but its buildings have been stripped to their core. After the Velvet Revolution of the 1980s, Russian forces started to leave. So quickly did they leave in 1991 that live ammunition was buried across the site, making the deserted town now potentially very dangerous.

22. The Soviet monument at Mount Buzludzha is the largest of its kind in Bulgaria.

The Soviet monument at Mount Buzludzha is the largest of its kind in Bulgaria.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

This is where Bulgarian Socialists first began meeting in secret in 1891 and where Bulgarian forces battled Turkish forces. It was funded by voluntary donations and features marble and glass. Pictured is the huge amphitheatre, with its mural depicting Soviet and Bulgarian history.

23. The structure was abandoned in 1989 and then gifted to the state in 1991. It’s been stripped of its valuable materials.

The structure was abandoned in 1989 and then gifted to the state in 1991. It's been stripped of its valuable materials.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

24. There was once a tower 70 metres tall, topped with a huge star made of red glass, designed to be three times bigger than the star at the Kremlin.

There was once a tower 70 metres tall, topped with a huge star made of red glass, designed to be three times bigger than the star at the Kremlin.

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rebeccalitchfield.com / carpetbombingculture.co.uk

Like all these structures, it now lies gathering ice, rust and dust.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/patricksmith/mysterious-and-chilling-pictures-of-abandoned-buildings-f

AGAIN!? Rob Reiner & Rosie O’Donnell spot reason to believe it might be ‘GAME OVER’ for Trump

Louise Mensch, who already knows who’s responsible for robbing Hillary Clinton of a victory she “deserved,” thinks she has the goods on Trump:

Read more: http://twitchy.com/dougp-3137/2017/04/17/again-rob-reiner-rosie-odonnell-spot-reason-to-believe-it-might-be-game-over-for-trump/

29 Photos Of Russia You Won’t Believe Are 100 Years Old

Photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii (1863-1944) made a survey of the Russian Empire with the support of Tsar Nicholas II. He used a special camera with red, green, and blue filters, which allowed them to be recombined and projected with filtered lanterns that nearly show their true color.

All images courtesy of the Library of Congress.

1.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Armenian woman in national costume poses for Prokudin-Gorskii on a hillside near Artvin (in present day Turkey), circa 1910.

2.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Emir Seyyid Mir Mohammed Alim Khan, the Emir of Bukhara, seated holding a sword in Bukhara, (present-day Uzbekistan), 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Prokudin-Gorskii self portrait beside the Karolitskhali River, in the Caucasus Mountains near Batumi.

4.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Kasli Iron Works, 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Prokudin-Gorskii on a handcar, outside Petrozavodsk on the Murmansk railway along Lake Onega near Petrozavodsk in 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Sim River, part of the Volga watershed in 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

A chapel on the site where the city of Belozersk was founded, 1909.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Tblisi, Georgia from the grounds of Saint David Church, circa 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Isfandiyar Jurji Bahadur, Khan of the Russian protectorate of Khorezm (now a part of modern Uzbekistan), 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Peasants harvesting hay, Mariinskii Canal, 1909.

11.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

A man and woman in Dagestan, circa 1910.

12.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Georgian woman, 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Women in Dagestan, 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Pinkhus Karlinskii, 84 years old with 66 years of service. Supervisor of Chernigov floodgate, 1909.

15.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Artvin (now in Turkey) from the small town of Svet, circa 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Nikolaevskii Cathedral from southwest Mozhaisk in 1911.

17.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

A group of Jewish children with a teacher in Samarkand, (modern Uzbekistan), 1910.

18.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

A switch operator on the Trans-Siberian Railroad, near the town of Ust Katav on the Yuryuzan River, 1910.

19.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Workers and supervisors preparing to pour cement for sluice dam foundation across the Oka River near Belomut, 1912.

20.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Uzbek woman in purdah in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, circa 1910.

21.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Mezhevaya Utka, 1912.

22.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Sim River, 1910.

23.

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Via Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Water-carrier in Samarkand (present-day Uzbekistan), circa 1910.

24.

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Via Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Lake Lindozero in 1910.

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Via Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Factory in Kyn, Russia, 1912.

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Via Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Russian children near White Lake, 1909.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Sukhumi, Abkhazia and its bay from Cherniavskii Mountain, 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Ural mountains, 1910.

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Prokudin-Gorskii Collection / Library of Congress

Court of Tillia-Kari mosque in Samarkand, present-day Uzbekistan, circa 1910.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/29-photos-of-russia-you-wont-believe-are-100-years-old